THE EVOLUTION OF CONSCIOUSNESS: How Do We Sever Our Entanglement With Worldly Issues? – PART 4

Last month, in Part 3, Kamlesh D. Patel described the journey we embark upon to expand consciousness and the role of Yogic Transmission, as well as some of the basic spiritual anatomy associated with the beginning of the inner journey.

In Part 4, he now explores with us in more detail how we become entangled in worldly issues, how that expresses in the spiritual anatomy of a human being, and what we can do to remove the impressions that form.


In Part 2 of this series, we explored the need to refine and purify the subtle body, so that consciousness can expand and evolve. In fact, without this cleaning of the subtle body there is no real evolution. What needs to be cleaned from the subtle body?

Close your eyes for a moment and imagine the subtle body, the heart-mind field of a human being, as a vast field of subtle energy, of consciousness. If it helps, imagine it is like a large body of water. When the field is pure, it is absolutely still and calm, like a glassy lake. When it is disturbed by turbulence, it is choppy and rough, and the water is moving in all directions. Eddies of water form, creating currents.

Similarly, the subtle body can also be filled with turbulence, due to the many impressions that form on a daily basis. When these impressions become more fixed, they lodge in our system creating heaviness and knots of energy that eventually solidify. They are known in the yogic literature as samskaras, and because of their materiality they are the cause of our coming again and again into this physical plane of existence through birth and rebirth.

So how do we form impressions in the subtle body? Let’s understand the way they form, and how each impression is drawn by its vibration to a particular centre in the human system. When we read the works of Ram Chandra of Shahjahanpur, he gives a beautiful example. You are walking home and you notice a beautiful rose flower blossoming, so you admire its beauty. The next time you are passing, you go near and admire its beauty in more detail. The next day, you feel like holding that flower in your hand and smelling it. Progressively a day may come when you say, “Let me take this rose bush home.”

We are attracted to some things, like the beautiful rose flower and its fragrance, and we dislike others, like the thorns of the rose bush. Our orientation – our attraction or repulsion – creates an emotion in our heart. That emotion is not in the mind; it is always in the heart. It forms an impression. When we repeat that emotion again and again, it forms a deeper habitual pattern in our heart, that becomes more and more fixed as a samskara: “I don’t like spaghetti,” “I am scared of my boss,” “I love to go swimming,” “I do not trust men,” etc. etc. This belief then affects the way we live our daily life, coloring our perception and decisions.


“Our orientation – our attraction or repulsion – creates an emotion in our heart… It forms an impression. When we repeat that emotion again and again, it forms a deeper habitual pattern in our heart, that becomes more and more fixed as a samskara.”

We face different types of problems, issues, likes and dislikes in worldly life. When we are constantly worrying about our worldly problems, a level of anxiety and worry builds up, and accordingly this forms heaviness in the heart. No one can escape worldly worries and everything in moderation is tolerable. When we worry about something it is a good indication that we have to act upon it, but worrying about it perpetually, without acting to solve the problem, is only going to make it worse. When we constantly think about worldly problems and brood over them it affects point A, which is found close to the heart on the left side of the chest.

Another part of human existence is our attraction towards the opposite sex. Again, when it is in moderation it is tolerable, but when it overburdens us those impressions form at point B.

When we have strong likes and dislikes, what we also call prejudices for and against certain things and people, we may not speak about them but we are constantly playing with them in our hearts, and they affect our thinking often without us knowing they are doing so. Those impressions are deposited at point C.

Guilt is one of the heaviest impressions we can form. It arises out of something we did not do but should have done, or something we did but should not have done. Guilt gives rise to so much heaviness in the heart and this heaviness is deposited at point D.

To find point A, measure two finger widths to the right side to your left nipple, and then three fingers down.

Go two finger widths further down from point A to find point B.

Go two finger widths further down from point B to find point C. It will be on the lowest rib, directly underneath points A and B.

Go two finger widths to the left to find point D, exactly below the nipple.

This is the anatomical aspect of these points to which we attract certain impressions. These are not the only points in the human system where impressions lodge, but they are some of the most important and a good place to start.

Why is it helpful to share this knowledge? So that we become more aware. When we notice impressions lodging, we can adjust ourselves and clean ourselves, instead of judging things all the time.

Self-acceptance is a very vital attitude in any process of personal transformation. Without it, we stay stuck in judgement and it is difficult to then let go of the impressions; instead we go round and round thinking about them, making them deeper. It also becomes difficult to develop love for ourselves without self-acceptance. Without self-love, we are handicapped, and love for others will also not develop. We will not get to first base.


“Self-acceptance is a very vital attitude in any process of personal transformation. Without it, we stay stuck in judgement and it is difficult to then let go of the impressions; instead we go round and round thinking about them, making them deeper. It also becomes difficult to develop love for ourselves without self-acceptance.”

The process of cleaning removes these impressions that form around the heart, creating lightness and a carefree feeling. With this we can happily work on changing ourselves, and the journey begins.

Cleaning is an integral part of the daily Heartfulness practice, and is done in the evening after the day’s work. It complements meditation by purifying the subtle body. It is one of the most incredible tools we have for self-development, as it removes those habits and patterns that keep us stuck in our own little world and prevents us expanding our consciousness into the vastness that is waiting us on our journey of self-discovery.

In Part 5, we will explore more of the inner journey of the human experience.

___________________

Article by KAMLESH D. PATEL

The Evolution of Consciousness – PART 3

Last month, in Part 2, Kamlesh D. Patel described the subtle body of a human being, including how it evolves, and the importance of a meditative practice in that process. In this issue, he introduces us to the journey we embark upon to expand consciousness and the role of Yogic Transmission in that journey.


Just to recap, it is the subtle body that evolves, and as a result consciousness evolves, allowing us to transform and design our destiny. As we purify and simplify the subtle body, the joy of the soul radiates from within, and we are able to expand our consciousness into higher states, revealing more and more of our human potential.

In Part 2, we looked at the process of refinement and purification of the subtle body, so that consciousness can expand and evolve. The purer and simpler our vibrational field, the more we can observe, explore, and expand across the spectrum of subconsciousness, consciousness and superconsciousness. In fact, without this cleaning of the subtle body, there is no real inner journey! As we progress, our ego becomes more and more refined, we develop wisdom and uncover the world of feeling and beyond, all of which are possible through a system of heart-based meditation with cleaning of the subtle body.


The purer and simpler our vibrational field, the more we can observe, explore, and expand across the spectrum of subconsciousness, consciousness and superconsciousness.

There is also a second process that aids our journey into higher and higher states of consciousness. Without it, we would not maneuver past the obstacles, like with any journey into unknown universes. That vital ingredient is Yogic Transmission, known in the yogic literature as pranahuti. More particularly, it is Yogic Transmission utilised by a teacher of caliber.

We often think of spiritual teachers – yogis, mystics, saints, sufis and shamans – as being full of wisdom and love. They speak wisely, and inspire us with wonderful words and insights. But words on their own are not catalysts for inner transformation. Wisdom can encourage and inspire us to want to change and evolve, but it does not make the transformation happen.

While love is transformative, as we know from worldly life – love can work miracles, conquer all, and make the world go round – the love required for inner evolution of consciousness is a universal love that is beyond anything we normally understand in worldly life. Here the teacher’s role is paramount.

The transformative effect of Yogic Transmission has been one of the greatest mystical secrets throughout the ages. What was once passed down only from heart to heart by spiritual teachers of caliber to their immediate disciples, is now openly available to all humanity. And this process requires explanation.


The transformative effect of Yogic Transmission has been one of the greatest mystic secrets throughout the ages. What was once passed down only from heart to heart by spiritual teachers of caliber to their immediate disciples is now openly available to all humanity.

Some basic spiritual anatomy

In Part 1 of this series, we spoke about the three bodies of a human being – the physical, mental and causal; body, mind and soul; matter, energy and absolute; the three major states of existence in physics also – energy solidified into matter, energy as vibrational field, and potential energy in its unmanifested state.

It starts to become really interesting when we realize that the centre or connecting link of these three bodies is the heart.That is why scientists these days are finding that the electromagnetic field of the heart is the dominant field in the human body.2

From this vibrational heart, currents radiate out into worldly life. Some are directed towards the physical world of matter – we need energy to exist and perform actions in the physical plane, e.g. walking, lifting, gardening, dancing, exercising, and so on.

Some of the heart’s currents are also directed into the mental sphere of existence: thinking, studying, teaching, research, problem-solving, or engaging in any other way in the field of knowledge and wisdom.


In a person who wants evolution of consciousness, some of the heart’s current needs to turn inward, away from the external world.

Now, in a person who wants evolution of consciousness, some of the heart’s current needs to turn inward, away from the external world.

We can also explain it like this: the stream of thoughts we constantly receive from the universe comes from the cosmic realm, where everything originates, what we call brahmand mandal in yoga. Imagine the stream is descending from above, down through the crown of the head into our system. The thought stream descends into the heart and in most people 99 percent of it goes outwards from the heart, to be used in worldly life.

When the inner journey starts, one stream of the heart’s current is diverted inwards. Not all, as we still have to live in the world, look after a family, manage a job etc., but enough so that the pull of the soul is felt.

On the left side of the chest, the currents are radiating outwards into worldly life from the point where the physical heart is found. When one stream is turned inwards, it turns towards the right side of the chest, to the point in the human spiritual anatomy known as the atman chakra or soul point. This is the spiritual heart of a human being.

The catalyst for this inward movement is a teacher of caliber, who utilizes Yogic Transmission for this purpose. As we then continue to meditate, we are drawn towards the inner universe and start to integrate it with worldly life, so that both continue side by side.

But this inward movement can be a difficult transition. It is like moving from one galaxy to another, and as with any change the mind rebels, feeling uncomfortable at first, much like when we move from one house, one city or one job to another. It takes a while to settle in. This is itself the first hurdle in our journey of expansion of consciousness. If we can cross that hurdle, the first step in the battle is won! Now we enter the realm of a different type of human consciousness – that of the immense peace and calm of the soul point.

…But this is just the beginning of our journey.

In Part 4, we will explore in more detail how our minds keep us entangled in worldly issues that stifle the expansion of consciousness, and how we can address this through spiritual practice.

To be continued…

___________________

1 Ram Chandra of Fatehgarh, Truth Eternal, 2015, Shri Ram Chandra Mission, India
2 Reported by HearthMath and others.
Article by KAMLESH D. PATEL

About Kamlesh D. Patel

Kamlesh Patel is the world teacher of Heartfulness, and the fourth spiritual Guide in the Sahaj Marg system of Raja Yoga. He oversees Heartfulness centers and ashrams in over 150 countries, and guides the thousands of certified Heartfulness trainers who are permitted to impart Yogic Transmission under his care. Known to many as Daaji, he is also an innovator and researcher, equally at home in the inner world of spirituality and the outer world of science, blending the two into transcendental research on the evolution of consciousness. Building on the insights of his first Guide, Ram Chandra of Shahjahanpur, he is expanding our understanding of the purpose of human existence to a new level, so necessary at this pivotal time in human history.

The Evolution of Consciousness: The Subtle Body & How It Evolves – Part 2

In Part 1 of this series, Kamlesh D. Patel described the three main bodies that together, form the base of life forms on earth. In this second article of the series, he explores one of these in depth; the subtle body, and how it evolves.


THE SCIENCE OF SPIRITUALITY


Which body evolves?

Understanding that we have these three bodies – physical, subtle, and causal – we can then ask, which of these bodies is evolving?

The soul is immutable. It is pure, absolute and unchangeable, and so the causal body does not evolve.

The physical body cannot change much. Its structure is fixed, although some minor changes can occur in weight, posture and fitness etc., but we cannot grow extra arms, wings to fly, or a tail in this lifetime.

It is the subtle body that can evolve, so that we can design our destiny. It changes according to how we purify and simplify it, so that the joy of the soul shines and radiates from within, and through this process we find the evolution of consciousness.

The Subtle Body

The subtle body is a vibrational field; the heart-mind field. Depending on how we manage this field, it can either be turbulent and complex, like a roaring ocean during a storm, or, at the other extreme, it can be like a still pond where even a feather landing on the surface creates ripples. This is where a spiritual practice has a vital role to play, as it gives us the techniques to regulate, purify, and simplify this field, bringing clarity, stillness, and peace.

In yogic philosophy the heart is known as the field of action for the mind. This is a vast topic. Let’s start to explore what this means.

There are four main functions of the subtle body within this vibrational field – consciousness (chit), thinking and feeling (manas), intellect (buddhi) and ego (ahankar). They work in an interactive way together to make up what we know as the mind.

Of these four, consciousness is our focus here. The other three have their existence in consciousness. Consciousness is as good as a canvas to a painter, and within consciousness the play of the other three bodies is orchestrated daily.

How do we actively allow our consciousness to expand and evolve? It is not enough just to wish it so. We need to understand how a spiritual practice contributes towards this evolution by creating the conditions for stilling the mind progressively at deeper and deeper levels, and opening up the inner universe.

At a physical level, when I want to strengthen my body muscles I have to exercise my body. Similarly, for the mind to evolve so that consciousness can expand, I must use what belongs to that subtle plane of existence. First, it is important to understand that the evolution of consciousness has nothing to do with the acquisition of knowledge. Second, consciousness in itself will not expand or evolve without the help of buddhimanas and ahankar to free it. Intellect has to evolve to help expand consciousness and ego must evolve, contributing to the evolution of consciousness.


Unless and until we meditate properly, and unless and until we regulate
our minds properly, our consciousness will not evolve.

Meditation

What does meditation have to do with this? We meditate to regulate our minds. An unregulated mind is pulled by wishes and desires, fears and habits, in many different directions. The mind becomes weak as it scatters in many different channels. In contrast, a regulated mind brings focus, and promotes well- being. Unless and until we meditate properly, and unless and until we regulate our minds properly, our consciousness will not evolve.

Manasbuddhi and ahankar are all refined and developed through meditation, especially manas as we learn to simplify our thinking process from many channels to one channel, then deepen it to feeling. Thus the habit of ‘feeling’ is slowly cultivated from ‘thinking’.

Developing the Meditative State Further

Holding and nurturing the condition received in meditation throughout the day is a byproduct of good meditation, and helps us regulate and deepen the mind to an even higher level. When we are in this state of constant awareness or remembrance of the inner state, we do not allow our canvas to be spoilt, so consciousness remains afresh. The canvas remains clean and is not destroyed by the multifarious impressions we form.

Imagine the heart-mind vibrational field having a spectrum of consciousness spanning the subconscious, conscious, and superconscious states. Swami Vivekananda once said, “Consciousness is a mere film between two oceans, the subconscious and the superconscious.” Or you can imagine the subconscious as being like the ocean, consciousness like the surface of the land, and superconsciousness like the sky going out into the universe. As we evolve, our consciousness expands into both the subconscious and superconscious realms, traveling through the vast infinity of the human potential. Another way of saying this is that we go deeper and deeper into the vastness of the heart, from our starting point at the surface.


Wisdom is to utilize all our faculties at their best.
Wisdom is to have the maximum output with the minimum input.

Buddhi and Prayer

In this process of diving deeper, the intellect, buddhi, becomes more and more heart-based. Intuition and inspiration develop, and buddhi becomes fine-tuned, like a sensitive antenna picking up the signals of the heart. Intellect evolves into a state of wisdom. Often we think of a wise person as someone who makes wise choices, but here we go further into a different dimension where choice is no longer required, as the heart’s wisdom is pure and correct.

There is a big difference between an intellectual person and a wise person, and here the spiritual practice of prayer helps us to move from mere intellect to wisdom. Prayer takes us into the heart, connecting us to the Source, where we are able to let go of any mistakes we have made, deciding not to make the same mistakes again. Is this not wisdom? Whereas if we succumb to making foolish mistakes day after day, hour after hour, we are not becoming wiser. We become wiser when we wish to change from the bottom of our hearts and ask for help to do so. When we live with this attitude every moment, wisdom flourishes.

Wisdom is to utilise all our faculties at their best. Wisdom is to have the maximum output with the minimum input. With minimum action we have the maximum result. Only with a meditative mind, only through meditative acts in our day-to-day life, can we expect to have such good results.

Purifying and Simplifying the Subtle Body Through Cleaning

For this to happen, the heart-mind field has to be purified, otherwise it is like expecting to see the bottom of a lake through muddy, turbulent water. There is no clarity in a turbulent mind. The spiritual practice of cleaning past impressions is therefore also necessary for consciousness to evolve.

Ahankar

The third aspect of the subtle body is ego, ahankar. Ego plays a vital role in whether or not expansion or evolution of consciousness occurs. Ego is often seen as the bad guy by spiritual practitioners of all traditions, but ego is also essential for our evolution. It is the active function of the mind – the doing, thinking function – and we need it in every aspect of daily life, even to have the craving to evolve. It gives us our identity. It is the activating or initiating force. If it is used wisely, it serves us well, like any other resource, but it is often misused, and this is what we commonly refer to as being egotistical. When ego is used for selfish purpose, we become arrogant and self-important, whereas if we constantly refine the ego, consciousness develops very rapidly.

What does it mean to refine the ego? The more humility we have, the less the egotistical proliferations. All great spiritual teachers have given so much importance to this aspect of character formation. They have valued this quality so highly that humility at any cost must be maintained, whether towards a child, a poor person, or a stranger. The philosophy here is that there is nothing wrong in thinking yourself to be great, but always think the other person in front of you is greater.

Ego can be like a black hole. It can have the greatest gravitational pull upon our consciousness. It will not allow consciousness to expand. Just as the earth’s gravitational pull does not allow us to fall into infinite space, likewise our ego can hold consciousness to its core. An example of this is a very narcissistic person, who is undergoing a devolutionary process where consciousness contracts in on itself to its core, and can become like a stone. In contrast, by transcending the relationship with the ego by refining it, becoming more and more humble, consciousness can expand infinitely.

Ego manifests in many ways. For example, in a music concert, when I am happily playing my flute as a performer, it gives so much joy and the audience reciprocates accordingly. But as an artist, I will not be happy unless I surpass my previous performances all the time. The manifested ego makes me perform well. But to think that no one can play the flute better than myself is not a welcome manifestation of ego. Ego can be our best friend in helping us outperform our own past records.


Ego can be like a black hole.
It can have the greatest gravitational pull upon our consciousness.
It will not allow consciousness to expand.

Manas

The fourth function of the subtle body is manas, which is the function of contemplation. During meditation, the first step is to bring the mind from many and varied thoughts to one thought, for example in Heartfulness it is the source of Divine Light in the heart. But it is not necessary that all throughout the meditation this thought should haunt us. The thought should leave at some point so that the object of thought can be felt in the heart.

If all you do is think this one thought throughout the meditation, you will have a headache and consciousness will not expand. This initial thought is just the springboard, to take us deeper so that we dissolve in the feeling of the presence of the Divine Light. You have to feel that presence and while you are feeling that presence slowly you disappear, and even feeling is gone. The ego is gone; you are not even there to experience it.

So as manas evolves through a meditation practice, feeling develops, and eventually we go beyond feeling to a state of being, then to a state of becoming, and finally unbecoming to merge into the Absolute state of existence.

Chit

So buddhimanas and ahankar evolve through spiritual practice, and with this the subtle body becomes lighter, purer and simpler, like the still pond with minimal ripples. With this, consciousness is able to expand and evolve.

What do we then do with this expanded consciousness we receive? Let’s say I have a particular state of mind, and I am aware that the condition is so good. After meditation, I go off to work. It is not enough just to hold that condition; I must be able to radiate that condition wilfully, consciously, and with the confidence that wherever I go it will spread its fragrance on its own.

So after meditation think for a while that, “The condition which is within me is also outside me. Everything around me is absorbed in a similar state. When I look at people, or talk to them, or listen to them, or I am silent, let that condition spread everywhere.” Let consciousness expand wherever it can go.

To be continued…


Article by KAMLESH D. PATEL

About Kamlesh D. Patel

Kamlesh Patel is the world teacher of Heartfulness, and the fourth spiritual Guide in the Sahaj Marg system of Raja Yoga. He oversees Heartfulness centers and ashrams in over 150 countries, and guides the thousands of certified Heartfulness trainers who are permitted to impart Yogic Transmission under his care. Known to many as Daaji, he is also an innovator and researcher, equally at home in the inner world of spirituality and the outer world of science, blending the two into transcendental research on the evolution of consciousness. Building on the insights of his first Guide, Ram Chandra of Shahjahanpur, he is expanding our understanding of the purpose of human existence to a new level, so necessary at this pivotal time in human history.

The Evolution of Consciousness – Part 1

This is the first in a series of articles by KAMLESH D. PATEL about the evolution of consciousness, and how spiritual practices are designed to help consciousness expand and evolve.


The Science of Spirituality

Part 1 – The Three Bodies

When we talk about weaving a destiny, a future for ourselves, what do we mean? In the worldly sense, we want a good life. From my one-bedroom apartment, I want a five-bedroom house; from owning one factory I hope to own ten factories; I dream of being promoted from the position of a clerk to that of a CEO; I want a happy and fulfilling family life, and to raise children who also have fulfilling lives.

From the spiritual perspective, we are concerned with a much bigger picture. In order to explore this further, we need to first describe the human makeup. We have a physical body made of flesh and blood that is the most solid part of us. While it changes a little bit, according to how we live our lives, it doesn’t change much. Physical evolution happens over longer periods than one lifetime, so we don’t expect our physical body to evolve in this life. The physical body is associated with matter.

We also have a subtle body, also known as the astral or mental body, that is associated with energy and vibration. This is what we call the heart and mind. The third body we have is our causal body, the cause of our existence, which is also known as the soul. The causal body is associated with the absolute state of nothingness, the substratum of existence. This causal body is pure, unchanging and immutable, so it is does not need to evolve.

With the physical and the causal bodies, we cannot expect to find evolutionary changes. When we want to change our thinking and our patterns of behaviour, during any process of self-development, be it psychological or spiritual, what evolves or transforms is the middle layer, the subtle body. Spiritual destiny has everything to do with the purification of the subtle body by removing the layers that surround it. In the mineral kingdom, all three bodies are so closely tied together that it is difficult to separate them; they don’t have much freedom. To the extent to which they can free themselves vibrationally, they have different qualities and we give them names like Gold, Lead, Osmium, etc.


Spiritual destiny has everything to do with the purification of the subtle body by
removing the layers that surround it.

In the plant kingdom, the three bodies are a little looser. Look at a tree. How do you know it has a subtle body that responds? Have you seen flowers that open up when the sun comes? How do they know? They respond so nicely, turning as the sun moves. There is also a plant called Lajvanti, and when you touch it the leaves fold in. When there is a breeze, or even a storm, the leaves and branches of trees dance, but the moment someone tries to cut the branch of a tree, it becomes agitated.

You can feel it. In plants, the subtle body, and the causal body are very tightly tied together, and the subtle body cannot express much. In animals, there is a still greater separation, and in human beings all the three bodies are labile or loosely connected. Among different human beings, there are also differences in separation. The three gunas in Vedic philosophy — tamasic, rajasic and sattvik — are based on how loosely or how strongly the bodies are connected.

In a sattvik person, the subtle body can move around, whereas a tamasic person is more stone-like. One person can think of something somewhere else, but another person with limited mental capacity may not grasp what is happening around them. Even if you tell them about it, their mind cannot reach there. Sometimes, when we communicate, certain concepts are not understood by the other person because of the subtle body’s inability to grasp them.


So at the level of the subtle body, we can choose to evolve and go beyond the animal level of existence to the human level to the divine level, by expanding our field of consciousness.

So at the level of the subtle body, we can choose to evolve and go beyond the animal level of existence to the human level to the divine level, by expanding our field of consciousness.

How can we describe the subtle body, and how does it evolve? There are four main functions of the subtle body that we will consider, and they are:

  • Chit or consciousness,
  • Manas or our contemplative faculty,
  • Buddhi or intellect, and
  • Ahankar or ego.

They all have a role to play in our evolution, and in the next part we will explore them further.

To be continued…

Article by KAMLESH D. PATEL

About Kamlesh D. Patel

Kamlesh Patel is the world teacher of Heartfulness, and the fourth spiritual Guide in the Sahaj Marg system of Raja Yoga. He oversees Heartfulness centers and ashrams in over 150 countries, and guides the thousands of certified Heartfulness trainers who are permitted to impart Yogic Transmission under his care. Known to many as Daaji, he is also an innovator and researcher, equally at home in the inner world of spirituality and the outer world of science, blending the two into transcendental research on the evolution of consciousness. Building on the insights of his first Guide, Ram Chandra of Shahjahanpur, he is expanding our understanding of the purpose of human existence to a new level, so necessary at this pivotal time in human history.

7 Things to Know About Pranahuti (Yogic Transmission) — A Global Guide To Heartfulness Meditation

Recently, I came across a few research articles by the world teacher and the fourth spiritual guide in the Sahaj Marg system of Raja Yoga, Kamlesh D. Patel, also known as Daaji, on his site at http://www.daaji.org. He talks about this beautiful yogic energy called pranahuti or Yogic Transmission, which is so potent, yet so subtle, and enables us to meditate so easily.

Daaji oversees Heartfulness centers and ashrams in over 150 countries, and guides the thousands of certified Heartfulness trainers who are permitted to impart Transmission under his care. He is also an innovator and researcher in spirituality, equally at home in the inner world of spirituality and the outer world of science. His research has led him to publish a series of essays called “Evolution of Consciousness” in the Heartfulness magazine. His research into the spiritual anatomy of the human system has led to the discoveries of new yogic ‘chakras,’ and techniques of spiritual training.

The spirit and the essence of the interview are offered here to get a taste of its fragrance.

  1. Pranahuti Infuses the Fragrance of Divinity

I asked, “What is pranahuti and why is it important for a seeker of spirituality?”

He replied, “Many-a-time, when we are seeking Divinity, we look outside ourselves: we go to our places of worship, as a means of creating a relationship with God. With the first pranahuti offered in your first meditation, awareness of Divinity is awakened in your heart. Subsequent sessions of meditation with Transmission nourish the sprouting seed of Divinity that exists in the heart. This leads to a culmination of Yoga, an  integration of the spiritual and materials aspects of our lives, and balances them.”

  1. Pranahuti Comes From the Infinite Source

In Sanskrit, prana means life-force and ahuti means offering, so pranahuti means ‘offering of the life-force.’

I wondered aloud: “If you go on sacrificing or transmitting from a limited source, does it not deplete?”

Daaji pointed out, “The person who is transmitting prana must be dwelling in the Infinite Source so that there is only constant rejuvenation, no depletion. A Guru of caliber is connected with this Source, the source of all Creation.”

  1. The Effect of Pranahuti Can Be Experienced

I asked for Daaji to explain the significance of the term Pranahuti.

 “The best way to understand Yogic Transmission is to experience its effects practically,” he explained. “For many people, the experience of receiving transmission is so convincing that no further proof or understanding is necessary.”

We so often look for external validation, rather than feeling for ourselves on an inner level.

This ancient yogic technique that transforms us from inside out is available for free. I wonder how many of us in the world have really benefited.

“Pranahuti is food for the soul, and nourishes our total well-being in a subtle manner. As a result we feel the effects over a period of time, and recognize its efficacy.”

  1. Pranahuti Helps Our Consciousness Evolve

My next question was about meditation’s effect on the evolution of consciousness.

He put it in simple words: “Pranahuti refines and purifies the energy field of a human being, what we call the subtle bodies or vibrational bodies. These subtle bodies include the intellect, the ego, the thinking mind and consciousness. As a result, consciousness expands and evolves. The purer and simpler our personal vibrations, the more we can observe, explore and expand across the spectrum of consciousness, which includes the subconscious, conscious and superconscious mind. As we progress, our ego becomes generous instead of insecure and selfish, our intellect evolves into wisdom, and the thinking mind deepens into the world of feeling and becoming.”

  1. Pranahuti Enables Self-Transformation

“So does that mean we bcome wiser?” I asked.

“Yes, very much so!” was his candid answer. “When we are able to make wise choices, our everyday lives become easier to navigate. Our eperception becomes clear, so we see situations for what they are, without the impact of past prejudices and beliefs. We are able to sail through life harmoniously.”

  1. Pranahuti Benefits Each One According to Individual Need

I asked, “Don’t we believe that the soul is already alive? Then why do we talk of giving life to the soul?”

Daaji gives a beautiful example of the cool showers during the monsoon season, which make the trees and plants so fresh, even though they may be alive already by using ground water! He explained that meditation with pranahuti is similar — we come out of meditation fresh, like having bathed in a pristine pool of water.

“It is then up to the seeker to make use of it in the best way they can,” he continued. “Some of us get bored and abandon meditation after some time. Many of us continue, but are not willing to fully make use of what we are given. A few dive into their inner universe and allow the Transmission to transform them in a very profound way.”

So it would seem that each person responds to pranahuti according to the degree of one’s own interest. It is not a matter of will power — we don’t need will power to eat ice cream, when we like it. If I like the effects of meditation on me, I harness it for my growth and observe the benefits over time.

  1. Pranahuti Has Always Been Free

“How could such a beautiful yogic energy of transmission possibly be free?” I wondered.

“If it were not free, what would you be willing to pay for such a life-transforming gift?” asked Daaji. “If it could so easily be bought, would it really be worth seeking? All the most precious life-giving things in the world are free if you think about it – the air we breathe, the mother’s love we receive as children, sunlight. No price can ever be put on such gifts.”

“Since the rediscovery of this Transmission in the late 19th century, it has been offered free of charge to all. My spiritual guide always said that peace cannot be sold; there is no price tag on the Divinity within each of us.”

If you would like to experience Yogic Transmission for yourself, please click on one of the links below:

Take Daaji’s masterclass series for beginners,

Download the ‘Let’s Meditate’ App onto your Smartphone,

Get in touch with a trainer at a HeartSpot center near you.

***

Author’s Bio:

The interviewer, Purnima Ramakrishnan, is an UNCA award-winning writer based in India. She is the recipient of the fellowship in Journalism by International Reporting Project, John Hopkins (SAIS). She is the Senior Editor at World Moms Network, which is a Forbes Top 100 website for women, writing from 30 countries. She is a regular contributor to Huffington Post, and in the past has contributed to the UN Foundation’s Shot@Life and also The Impatient Optimists.

How Our Minds Work In Day-To-Day Life & The Quality of Consciousness That Results From Calming The Mind

ROSALIND PEARMAIN shares some observations and insights into how our minds work in day-to-day life, and the quality of consciousness that results from calming the mind.

Picture source.


As soon as we wake up in the morning, our attention goes somewhere. Like a radar system, our minds pick up whatever seems to be loudest in their field of sensitivity. They might go to uncomfortable thoughts about the day ahead. They might focus on the question of how tired we still feel, or how drained we are, or how we can motivate ourselves to leave the snug invisibility of the duvet realm! Our attention might go of course to the dreams from which we have just awakened. Our focus might be seized by our nearest and dearest, our problems at work, our pets demanding attention, or our children needing help. It could also be that our direction of mind goes toward something to which we are looking forward.

So each day, we start the waking hours with mind activity that also has physical experience and emotions mixed with it. If you think about it, very often the first impressions of the day are shaped by the kinds of thoughts, sensations, and emotions that arise when we wake. They affect the day that unfolds, like a filter or haze or particular tune playing across the course of the day. This is like a quality of consciousness.

There can be so much variation in how we feel when we wake up. We can feel down or up, energized and fresh or tired and depressed. Children seem always to wake up with some kind of zest for the new day. I was surprised once when I interviewed Heartfulness meditators and heard a few say that the practice affected how they felt in the morning. They felt a kind of joy for the adventure of the new day ahead. It reminded them of how they had felt as a child.

There are two different threads of awareness weaving together here. It seems that there is a part of us that is always aware of something, as if we are making a map with our experience, through our brain and nervous system, telling us what is going on from moment to moment as it keeps changing. So we have a sense of being here in an environment and time, being alert to what is going on and vigilant in spotting new things happening. On the other hand, we can get in the car to drive a familiar route and find that we do not even notice where we are until we realize we have gone into autopilot and taken a turn that is not the one we wanted on this occasion! So our attention has gone somewhere else — perhaps to the challenging situation we will face at the end of the journey. Our awareness of where we are, here and now, is not very conscious at all. But if we look more closely, we discover that there is another part of us that is watching the flow. It is like a part of us stands on the riverbank and watches the flow of the water go by, the flow of stuff in our body-mind, but is also apart from it. It might suddenly alert us to the fact that we have taken the usual turning instead of the one we really want this time round.


… if we look more closely, we discover that
there is another part of us that is watching the flow.
It is like a part of us stands on the riverbank
and watches the flow of the water go by,
the flow of stuff in our body-mind, but is also apart from it.

Considering how vast the processing capacity of our brains and nervous systems is, we are hardly using much of it most of the time. According to Paul Reber, a professor of psychology at Northwestern University writing for Scientific American:

The human brain consists of about one billion neurons. Each neuron forms about 1,000 connections to other neurons, amounting to more than a trillion connections. . . . Yet neurons combine so that each one helps with many memories at a time, exponentially increasing the brain’s memory storage capacity to something closer to around 2.5 petabytes (or a million gigabytes).

self-being-consciousness

So we have been given a phenomenal capacity to work with many dimensions of experience and consciousness of living in this vast universe. Yet, most of the time, if we are honest, what preoccupies our minds are all kinds of rather small and limiting thoughts, ideas, emotions and obsessions, as a kind of undercurrent bubbling away. Our minds seem to run away from us and bother us with relentless activity.

Alternatively, we might feel a bit empty and bored, and desperately seek to find something to fill our attention, such as food or distractions — our smart phones, computer games, TV shows, or music. Our radar systems seems to be easily attuned to emotional and turbulent feeling experiences. Our awareness or consciousness is often taken by the more dramatic waveforms of emotion than the more harmonious ones of calm.

What shifts us out of these patterns? Physical activity or relaxation can help us feel connected to ourselves in a whole and immediate way, and also present and grounded in the moment. When we feel especially close to others, this can also release us from all the drama in our minds so that we can let go. Being in nature can suddenly awaken us to the simple and direct enjoyment of sun on skin or the flooding of colour from the greenness of nature. Immersion in water is the chance to feel even more sensation, as well as a quality of cleaning and refreshment, a kind of resetting of self into balance.

Over thousands of years, human beings have struggled with the same problems while facing life and adversity. Usually, painfully, there is no way to escape the givens of our existence. The only option we have is in our attitude toward facing them. We have choices in how our mind-body works with the struggles of living, but to be aware of these choices we have to look at how our likes and dislikes keep us spinning in the same wheel like a hamster.  Have you ever observed how your mind repeats the same thoughts and patterns and feelings, so that there does not seem to be a way out? Our radar system can be trained to focus somewhere else, less noisy and clamouring. We can find ways to interrupt or change the ceaseless chuntering of our mental flow.


Our radar system can be trained to focus somewhere else,
less noisy and clamouring.
We can find ways to interrupt or change
the ceaseless chuntering of our mental flow.

So the practice of meditation came about in a myriad of forms. It gave a rocky but stable base on which our radar system could rest in the middle of a  turbulent ocean of life. This tool for opening our mind and our consciousness from its prison gives us the main chance we have for transformation and for discovering the ingredients for a harmonious, inspiring, and fulfilling life.

About Ros Pearmain

Ros lives in Abingdon near Oxford, UK, and has worked with groups of all ages during her working life. She has always been interested in how we can change and transform. In recent years she has been teaching psychotherapy and qualitative research and is a Heartfulness trainer.

The article was originally published in Heartfulness Magazine but has been republished on Collective Evolution with the consent of the original publisher.

The Real Purpose of Meditation: Shifting From Thinking To Feeling With Your Heart

 Meditation is a process in which we shift from thinking to feeling. It is a journey from the complexity of mind to the simplicity of heart.

 Meditation is often defined as thinking continuously about one object of thought. We often get stuck on this definition, however, and lose the real purpose of meditation. Meditation must reveal the true nature of that object upon which we are meditating. Such revelation comes not as a thought, but as a feeling. Therefore, meditation is a process in which we shift from thinking to feeling. It is a journey from the complexity of mind to the simplicity of heart. It is for this reason that most methods of meditation involve the heart.

Though we can easily remember an image or an idea, it is difficult to recollect a feeling. Have you ever tried to recollect the taste of a meal you had many years back? You may vividly remember the place where you ate. You may even remember its ambience, but the actual taste of the food can never be retrieved. Why? It is because feeling is always in the present, in the now. Therefore, we cannot be happy with the feeling of a good meditation from eons back. Of course, the memory of a great revelation in meditation is good, but it is akin to someone who hits the jackpot once in his lifetime and is a beggar forever more. The feeling we derive in meditation must become a permanent affair.


In true meditation, we enter into absolute nothingness, a complete void of experience.


Yet, even feeling has its limitation. The heart is never truly satisfied with feeling. At some point, feeling becomes a burden, whether it is the feeling of pleasure, of joy, or even of bliss. Feelings are difficult to handle. In true meditation, we enter into absolute nothingness, a complete void of experience.

If you examine consciousness, you will find that it has a variety of states, just as water has different states. We have waking consciousness, with which we interact with the world. The consciousness of a person whose attention is only focused outwardly perceives only the outside world, accordingly. When we are asleep, we enter into the dreaming consciousness, and in deep sleep, our consciousness goes very deep. In meditation, our consciousness is moving toward the innermost Self, which is the core of our existence. As we traverse through the various states of meditation, we enter into a special state of consciousness where we are, at once, at the depths of our being, while being simultaneously aware of the things around us. A true seeker of Reality, though inwardly meditating, is meditatively active in the worldly sense as well.

A true seeker of Reality, though inwardly meditating, is meditatively active in the worldly sense as well.


This contradiction between the attraction toward the Self within and the pull of our awareness toward its outer periphery is only valid so long as there is no all-encompassing meditative state that expands throughout all states of consciousness, whether waking, meditating, or sleeping. A person in such an expanded state of consciousness is unable to differentiate between worldly and spiritual activity, as all is done in a purely meditative state.

About the Author: Kamlesh D. Patel is the teacher of Heartfulness, and the fourth spiritual guide in the Heartfulness tradition of meditation. Known to many as Daaji, he has that rare capacity to dive deep into the center of his existence in the heart, while simultaneously having a scientific approach to original research in the field of meditation, spirituality and human evolution. He is a prolific speaker and writer, and you can read his latest writings at www.daaji.org.

The article was originally published in Heartfulness Magazine but has been republished on Collective Evolution with the consent of the original publisher.

Research Shows Our Genes Are Affected By Thoughts & Perceptions: More So Than We Realize

LISA ANN CATANO shares some of the research findings in epigenetics that show us that our genes are affected by our beliefs and thinking more than we realize.


Dr. Bruce Lipton, a cellular biologist who was at the University of Wisconsin cloning human muscle cells, is best known for challenging the existing belief that the human body is controlled by genes. In his video The Biology of Perception, he demonstrates to the audience that perception affects biology.

In one of his experiments, a stem cell was isolated and put into a petri dish (a cell-culture dish), where it divided every ten hours. The cells were then split up into three groups and placed into separate petri dishes, each of which contained different growth mediums. In the first dish the cells formed bone, in the second dish they formed muscle, and in the third dish they formed fat cells. All of the cells were genetically identical when they were first separated, yet each dish produced different results.


Dr. Lipton’s research is life changing for all of us,
because his research enunciates that
we have the power to choose our destiny at any given point.
From victims we can become masters of our lives,
as we can determine how we respond to the environment.

Dr Bruce Lipton during a lecture.

Why was this so? Since the genes were all identical, the differences arose because of the environment in which they were placed. The environment was the stimulus to which the cells responded, which means genes respond to their environment. It is the genes’ perception of their environment that causes them to behave in a certain way.

We have been taught that our genes determine our lives — our behaviour, emotions, character, health, and biology — and that we do not have any control over our lives. We have been told that our genes are inherited from our family and we are a victim to this heredity: If there is cancer in your family, you are vulnerable to that illness; if your father or mother were prone to addiction, you will to some extent be the same, or feel entitled to justify similar behaviour. This brings about a feeling of powerlessness, that your life is destined to be a certain way because of your genes. So a kind of apathy takes over, a ‘Why should I try?’ attitude.

Dr. Lipton’s research is life changing for all of us, because his research enunciates that we have the power to choose our destiny at any given point. From victims we can become masters of our lives, as we can determine how we respond to the environment. Of course the genetic patterns are there, but they are not as fixed as we once believed.

Book:  The Biology of Belief: Unleashing the Power of Consciousness, Matter and Miracles

 


Between stimulus and response there is a space.
In that space is our power to choose our response.
In our response lies our growth and our freedom.
– Viktor E. Frankl

You were born into the world without any beliefs, and since you learned to believe certain things through the instruction of your parents, education, and social systems, you have the ability to unlearn them and try new ones. As you change your thinking, you change your mind and biology, which culminates in an evolved reality.

In addition to the new understanding that perception influences behaviour, Dr. Lipton goes even deeper by saying that perception not only influences genes, but it also rewrites them! Like any living being, the cell is a conscious organism. By virtue of its state of consciousness, the cells’ perception of the environment is what controls the gene. In his study, Dr. Lipton provides proof of how a belief actually switches on a gene.

To demonstrate the power of belief, let’s take the example of our beloved insect, the bumble bee. Aerodynamically the bumble bee is not really designed to fly. This is apparent in observing its rounded hairy body that is much larger than the little wings that struggle to carry it. Now imagine that someone repeatedly told the bumble bee at a young age that she was not designed for flight; do you suppose she would be flying today? Of course not, and yet the bumble bee flies nonetheless, even if a bit clumsily at times. Belief is powerful and can often override the most logical reasoning.


When the mind is peaceful,
we are free from worries and mental discomfort,
and we begin to experience true happiness.
In this state of grace and Godliness,
healing can be restored.

A Medical Example

In his autobiography, Memories, Dreams, Reflections, Carl G. Jung describes a patient sent by an American colleague with the accompanying diagnosis: “Alcoholic neurasthenia: incurable.” Jung discovered that the patient was struggling to hold onto his manhood in a tyrannical relationship with his mother. According to Jung she was a “power devil.” She owned a large firm where the son worked and was very unhappy. Due to her power games, he chose to drink as a way of self-medicating. He did not have the adequate self-belief or strength of character to stand up to her, or resign from the comfort of the wealthy family business.

Jung took the initiative, behind his back, to give his mother a medical certificate stating his inability to carry out his work-related responsibilities due to his alcoholism, and recommended his redundancy. Although the man was furious with Jung (albeit an unethical move for a medical practitioner), he went on to create a life in which he thrived. He built a successful career, among other things, and his wife was extremely grateful to Jung for his instinctive approach to what seemed like a hopeless case. The man gave up drinking and his character developed and strengthened handsomely.

This is a fine example of a man who generated a wholesome life and personality by changing the constituents of his environment. By removing himself from a negative situation that did no service to his character, he was able to create a new life.

Meditation as a remedy.

Remedy

Meditation and visualization are strong repertoires for holistic health and vitality. Studies illustrate that meditation can diminish all kinds of physical diseases and psychological disorders. The immune system, blood pressure, pain response, stress hormone levels, and even cellular health can all be improved. Psychologically, meditation reduces depression and anxiety disorders, ADHD, bipolar disorder, addiction, and eating disorders, among others.

Meditation actually makes structural changes to the brain and reprograms the DNA. The way neurons communicate with each other can change and thus create new circuits. Some brain regions become denser than others and others become less dense. Neurogenesis and neuroplasticity improve, including memory, critical thinking, and overall cognitive functionality.

Meditation alters perception and the mind. It is a method for acquainting our minds with virtue. The more familiar our mind is with virtue, the calmer and more peaceful it becomes. When the mind is peaceful, we are free from worries and mental discomfort, and we begin to experience true happiness. In this state of grace and Godliness, healing can be restored. Thus, the practice of meditation confirms the outcome of Dr. Lipton’s experiments, which state that perception influences genes and can also rewrite them.

About Lisa Ann Catano

Lisa lives in South Africa and is a writer, New Insights life coach, and currently training to become a recovery coach through the Foundation Clinic. Lisa is passionate about empowering people, conscious awareness and being a flame of love. Her life experience has taught her about the importance of change in one’s life and to always learn, unlearn and relearn.

Four Simple Hacks That Can Help Liberate Anyone From Experiencing Stress

This is an excerpt of a workshop coordinated by VÉRONIQUE BRASSELET and EMMA MILESI during the Heartfulness days at the Cité Internationale in Lyon in January 2016.


The Heart’s Simplicity Reduces Stress

Stress is everywhere in our daily lives. When it is positive (eustress), it is considered beneficial; when it is negative (distress), it inhibits our potential and prevents us from accomplishing our objectives.

What is stress?

Stress is something that causes a state of strain or tension.

What hides behind stress?

Our fears. Fear is part of daily life, and it is present everywhere. According to its intensity, stress will be more or less severe, uncomfortable, challenging, or crippling.

Various sources of stress

1. Daily worries — for example, missing the bus and arriving late, or being unable to finish all that was planned for the day.

2. Undergoing fear — for example, speaking in public, being interviewed for a job, not reaching our parents’ expectations, or required job performance.

3. Undergoing binding, sometimes crippling fear — for example, reliving an old wound that made us suffer. Examples include not being loved, being abandoned, failing, hurting others, or the fear of being judged by others.

4. The growing pace of life — for example, fear of anything new, of change, or of not adapting.

Fear/Stress is a film we create for ourselves, a mental scenario, which confines us to a narrow vision excluding reality. Our interpretation distorts reality into false beliefs about ourselves and others.

Stress, in particular distress, reveals that something is not quite right, and allows us to question ourselves: “What is causing me to feel stressed or frightened?”

Various Reactions Under Stress

Our survival instinct forces us to act in one of three ways: defend ourselves, flee, or stay dumbstruck on the spot!

Stress acts specifically at different levels

1. The Brain

spiritual-self-beingStress specifically targets the brain areas implicated in coordinating cognition and emotions:

a) The cognitive functions coordinated by the prefrontal cortex, such as language, memory, and the ability to reason, plan, and organize.

b) Adaptability — calmness, problem solving, and decision-making.

c) Emotions, such as aggression, fear, and pleasure, controlled by the limbic system.

According to the degree of stress, we more or less lose these faculties, and this can lead to lack of spontaneity, to depression, and even to psychomotor retardation.

The limbic system is the seat of our impulses, fears, and angers. It emotionally colours any information received and grades it as agreeable or disagreeable. Its main function is survival by suitable adaptation to the social environment. Under stress, it focuses on survival — fight or flight — and deprives us from thinking clearly, e.g. blank page syndrome.

Consequently, with stress (distress), we lose our capacity for reflection, and emotions take over. Take, for example, a job interview; some will have clammy hands while others will not turn up, the stress being too unbearable.

How Does the Brain Treat Information?

Imagine your brain as a multi-storey house.

First of all, information goes to the reptilian brain, the instinctive brain. If the body is in survival mode, as when you are hungry, for instance, the information will be slowed down, even completely blocked if the hunger is severe. If body survival is not threatened, the information moves to the second storey into the limbic system, the emotional brain.

Here the information is classified as agreeable or disagreeable. If it is agreeable, it passes through to the cortex and then you may have an answer to your mathematics problem! If it is considered disagreeable, failure is guaranteed! In the worst of cases, the limbic system will not allow the information to pass to the cortex.

How does the limbic system assess information? Like an arbitrator, it adds up the plusses and minuses.

For each disagreeable thought it allocates a minus, and for each agreeable thought it allocates a plus. Say you have a math problem. If you say, “I am hopeless at math,” or “This teacher is poor,” or “My family has never been good at math,” it is a minus. If, on the other hand, you are feeling positive, then you create a plus.

To continue the metaphor of the multi-storey house, let’s say there is a door to go from the limbic system to the cortex. The plusses try to open the door, while the minuses try to shut it. The team that has the most wins.

What does a team coach do before a football match? He talks positively to the players, saying, “We will win,” and “We are the best,” so the information passes directly to the cortex and the team can play at its best level.

In fact, when information is considered agreeable or very agreeable by the limbic system, the limbic system passes it to the cortex, and then the cortex deals with it as a priority.

2. The Hormones

The hormones adrenaline and noradrenalin are released in stressful situations, and they accelerate our heart rhythm and breathing to allow the organs linked to movement to increase their functions and thus to support defence or escape.

3. Behaviour and Emotions

Stress leads to:

  • Dependency, jealousy, withdrawal, and even submission,
  • Withdrawal due to fear of showing weaknesses and not meeting expectations
  • Difficulty in saying no, tendency to avoid conflicts,
  • Hindrance of all action and relations,
  • Withdrawal due to sadness and despondency,
  • Compensation, such as eating disorders, drinking, and smoking.

Activity: How to Liberate Stress in Four Stages

spiritual-self-beingAsk a friend to guide you through the steps.

Step 1: Observe it

Put yourself at ease, breathe calmly, and close your eyes. Observe any current stress that you feel.

Identify the emotions that take place inside you when you are aware of that stress.

Identify the physical symptoms that appear, such as sweating, breathing, clammy hands, etc.

Identify how you react to this stress: Do you run away, stand up to it, or become inert?

Note the stress level on a scale from 1 to 10.

Breathe in slowly and deeply through your nose, and breathe out through your mouth.

Step 2: Feel it

Recognize it, expressing inwardly, “I feel stressed because…”

Inhale slowly through your nose, and exhale through your mouth.

Feel this stress as deeply as possible, so as to integrate it.

Feel the emotions that surface. We are often afraid to feel these emotions because we think they are bad and we will become like that.

Inhale slowly through your nose, and exhale through your mouth.

Step 3: Accept it

Welcome your stress without judging and with benevolence, as it is part of you.

Inhale slowly through your nose, and exhale through your mouth.

Accept it. What feelings occur when you do? What physical changes do you observe?

Welcome this new sensation, explore it, appreciate it, amplify it while breathing naturally, let it spread throughout your body, and feel the energy circulating.

Step 4: Integrate it

Do you feel that something has changed or loosened?

Be ready to listen to a new understanding.

Bring your attention again to the same stress: How do you feel now with it? If there is no improvement, wait some time and if necessary, try again.

Note the stress level that you feel now on a scale of 1 to 10.

Thank yourself that you took care of yourself.

When we take the time to welcome what happens inside us and acknowledge it, we digest it better. We give ourselves permission to live in the present. Then, slowly, we will accept it, integrate it, and then transcend it.

This is our personal work.

When we cut ourselves off from our feelings, we try to stand back and intellectualize, and then our emotions take over. To free ourselves from our stresses is a proof of maturity and wisdom.



Article and activity by VÉRONIQUE BRASSELET and EMMA MILESI