This Is Why The Nazi Party Loved Drinking Decaf Coffee

(Mayukh Saha) Around six centuries ago, the coffee that we are now used to consuming every day started appearing on tables across the world. It was a brilliant replacement because earlier versions were not very strong and they ranged from tea made with coffee beans to mixtures of animal fats and beans. Those who didn’t want the rush from drinking coffee had to look for alternatives like chicory which had the bitterness and smell of coffee. Then a hundred and fourteen years ago, in Germany, Ludwig Roselius, who had completed his apprenticeship with a coffee roaster, created a tasty substitute for coffee without caffeine.

The post This Is Why The Nazi Party Loved Drinking Decaf Coffee appeared on Stillness in the Storm.

Coffee Without the Jitters: Here’s All You Need to Know about Decaffeinated Coffee

(Grace Olson) Coffee is a much-loved drink, but not everyone likes the palpitations that come along with it. In the course of its long history, chemists have devised multiple methods to decaffeinate, or remove caffeine from, coffee beans, ensuring that coffee-lovers will still be able to get a good night’s sleep.

The post Coffee Without the Jitters: Here’s All You Need to Know about Decaffeinated Coffee appeared on Stillness in the Storm.

60% of Wild Coffee Species Could Go Extinct – Here’s Why

New research says that more than half of the world’s wild coffee is at risk of extinction. Thanks to an ever-changing climate, deforestation, and disease, your morning caffeine could one day become a thing of the past, if the authors’ conclusions are correct. [1]

Scientists from the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew, in the United Kingdom, analyzed 124 known coffee species and found that 75 – 60% – are at risk of extinction. Thirteen of those species were deemed “critically endangered.”

Aaron Davis, Kew’s head of coffee research said: [2]

“We knew it would be high, but we didn’t actually think it would be that high.”

While there are conservation measures in place, the report makes it clear that they are not enough to protect wild coffee. What’s more, some of the species of coffee analyzed by the researchers may already be long gone.

Eimear Nic Lughadha, lead scientist for Kew’s Plant Assessment Unit and a co-author of the report, published in Science Advances and Global Change Biology, said:

“Some of the coffee species assessed have not been seen in the wild for more than 100 years, and it is possible that some may already be extinct.”

Read: Coffee Apocalypse Coming? Demand and Brazilian Drought Point to “Yes”

IUCN Extinction Risk Categories for Coffee Species | Waffle chart, showing the proportion and number of threatened, nonthreatened, and DD coffee species in main blocks, and the proportion and number of coffee species assigned to each IUCN extinction risk category. The total number of species is 124 [CR, 10.5% (13 species); EN, 32.3% (40 species); VU, 17.7% (22 species); NT, 8% (10 species); LC, 21% (26 species); DD, 11.3% (14 species)]. Each square is equal to one species. (Click for larger version.)

Here’s the scary part for coffee-lovers: Coffee arabica, the most popular species of coffee in the world, is now classified as endangered, in large part because ‘scientists expect it to be hit hard by future climate change.’ In addition, arabica coffee is especially susceptible to diseases, including the particularly devastating coffee leaf rust fungus. Even arabica-robusta hybrids that were once resistant are starting to succumb. [2]

The scientists conducted the survey of coffee species under guidelines from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The body publishes a global Red List of threatened species. [1]

The IUCN says the rate of threatened coffee species was determined to be “extremely high.”

Right now, the cultivated coffee industry is safe; thriving, even. But scientists worry about the long-term health of the industry if the wild coffee species go extinct. Coffee crops rely on wild strains for stability and diversity, as well as seeds and protection against diseases.

Wild coffee species cannot be saved by storing seeds in the “doomsday” seed vault in Spitsbergen, Norway, because coffee seeds will not germinate after being frozen. Instead, coffee beans have been haphazardly conserved in 52 field collections in coffee-growing countries. Conserving them this way is not only expensive, but it requires a great deal of labor and there are limited resources to protect the seeds. [2]

Total Number of Coffee Species Threatened with Extinction by Area | Map showing threatened coffee species by TDWG level 3 areas (countries or subdivisions of countries; see Materials and Methods for the definition of TDWG level 3). See fig. S1 for number of coffee species by area. (Click for larger version.)

The coffee scientists have prioritized 4 gene banks – 3 in Africa, and 1 in Costa Rica – in an effort to save wild coffee. These banks, the team says, need to be upgraded to provide the right conditions for existing plants, and they need to be able to share any genetic material. All of this is expected to cost the coffee industry approximately $25 million over the next 25 years.

Read: Coffee Leads to Immortality?! Study Outlines Longevity Benefits of Coffee

The majority of coffee is grown by small farmers, all of whom stand to lose their livelihood if wild coffee species die out. This is especially true of coffee grown in Ethiopia, Africa’s largest coffee producer. Arabic crops there are projected to decline by 85% by the year 2080 if greater conservation efforts aren’t soon undertaken.

By the end of the century, as much as 60% of the land used for coffee cultivation could become unstable. It goes without saying that this would be catastrophic for the more than 15 million people employed by the cultivated coffee industry. [1]

The authors of the report are calling for scientists, policy makers, coffee industry bodies, and farmers to breed more resilient strains and “protect the future of coffee.”

Davis said:

“Targeted action is urgently required.”

Sources:

[1] Time

[2] Science Magazine

Russell Davis, Natural News 12-5-17… “Drink coffee, live longer: Recent research finds 3 cups daily reduces the risk of death – from ALL causes”

Well… this is not why I personally drink coffee and have mochas, etc., etc. I love the flavor of coffee and have been drawn to it for some years now, and have loved trying variety after variety after variety.

I’ve known about the health benefits of coffee for several years, ever since doing research on it back in the early 2000s. Having studies on real people which back this up is more information that may help people get over the idea that coffee is just a “source of caffeine”.

So drink it or don’t drink it. But when you do, know that you may also be benefiting from the health benefits of coffee.

“Drinking up to three cups of coffee daily may improve longevity and reduce the risk of all-cause mortality, according to a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine… [they] examined the beneficial effects of coffee consumption among people across 10 European countries including the United Kingdom, Denmark, France, and Italy… The study has found out that coffee drinkers have exhibited healthier livers and better glucose control compared with non-drinkers. In addition, the scientists have observed a similar effect after consuming decaffeinated coffee.

““We found that higher coffee consumption was associated with a lower risk of death from any cause, and specifically for circulatory diseases and digestive diseases. Importantly, these results were similar across all of the 10 European countries, with variable coffee drinking habits and customs… our results suggest that moderate coffee drinking – up to around three cups per day – is not detrimental to your health, and that incorporating coffee into your diet could have health benefits,” Dr. Gunter adds.

“…the researchers have found that participants who had moderate coffee intake are less like to die of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, neurological diseases, and suicide compared with non-drinkers and those with lower coffee intake levels. The scientists have also observed that participants who drank either caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee both achieved similar health benefits.”

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Drink coffee, live longer: Recent research finds 3 cups daily reduces the risk of death – from ALL causes

(Natural News) Drinking up to three cups of coffee daily may improve longevity and reduce the risk of all-cause mortality, according to a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. As part of the study, a team of researchers at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and the Imperial College London has examined the beneficial effects of coffee consumption among people across 10 European countries including the United Kingdom, Denmark, France, and Italy. The study has received funding from the European Commission Directorate General for Health and Consumers and the IARC.

The research team has pooled data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study with a total cohort population of  521,330 participants older than 35 years. The scientists have then evaluated the participants’ diet through questionnaires and interviews. Data from a 16-year follow-up has revealed that nearly 42,000 participants died from various conditions such as cancer, circulatory diseases, heart failure, and stroke.

The study has found out that coffee drinkers have exhibited healthier livers and better glucose control compared with non-drinkers. In addition, the scientists have observed a similar effect after consuming decaffeinated coffee.

“We found that higher coffee consumption was associated with a lower risk of death from any cause, and specifically for circulatory diseases and digestive diseases. Importantly, these results were similar across all of the 10 European countries, with variable coffee drinking habits and customs. Our study also offers important insights into the possible mechanisms for the beneficial health effects of coffee. We found that drinking more coffee was associated with a more favorable liver function profile and immune response. This, along with the consistency of the results with other studies in the U.S. and Japan gives us greater confidence that coffee may have beneficial health effects,” lead author Dr. Marc Gunter reports in a university press release.

However, the expert has acknowledged the limitations of the study and stressed that moderate coffee intake may improve overall health.

“Due to the limitations of observational research, we are not at the stage of recommending people to drink more or less coffee. That said, our results suggest that moderate coffee drinking – up to around three cups per day – is not detrimental to your health, and that incorporating coffee into your diet could have health benefits,” Dr. Gunter adds.

Harvard study backs coffee’s beneficial effects

A 2015 study has also demonstrated that drinking three to five cups of coffee a day may boost the body’s overall well-being. Health experts at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health have pooled data from three large ongoing studies with a total cohort population of 208,501 participants as part of research. The scientists have also assessed the participants’ smoking habits, body mass index, and physical activity as well as alcohol consumption and other dietary factors. (Related: Coffee drinkers have a lower mortality rate and lower risk of various cancers.)

The findings reveal that more than 19,500 women and nearly 12,500 men have died from a range of causes during the follow-up period. However, the researchers have found that participants who had moderate coffee intake are less like to die of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, neurological diseases, and suicide compared with non-drinkers and those with lower coffee intake levels. The scientists have also observed that participants who drank either caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee both achieved similar health benefits.

“Bioactive compounds in coffee reduce insulin resistance and systematic inflammation. That could explain some of our findings. However, more studies are needed to investigate the biological mechanisms producing these effects,” first author Ming Ding explains in a university press release.

Sources include:

WW3.Imperial.AC.uk

HSPH.Harvard.edu

Filed under: apocalypse, new energies Tagged: coffee