The Gut’s Role in Food Allergies: Scientists Identify Changes in Gut Microbiota That May Prevent or Even Reverse Food Allergies

(Franz Walker) The effects of food allergies can range from simply being annoying or inconvenient, preventing you from eating your favorite food, to life-threatening, like difficulty breathing. While medical means of combating food allergies do exist, a recent study has found a more natural, and potentially more effective, method of fighting food allergies – adjusting gut bacteria.

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Doesn’t Stomach Acid Eat Bacteria? Researchers Successfully Identify the Hiding Place of H. Pylori, a Bacteria Linked to Stomach Ulcers, Cancer

(Evangelyn Rodriguez) The bacterium known as Helicobacter pylori is notorious for its ability to colonize humans and cause stomach ulcers. While an H. pylori infection rarely causes any symptoms, there are some cases where the bacterium causes open sores to form in the stomach or triggers severe inflammation — an event that could eventually lead to gastric cancer.

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Bacteria in the Gut May Alter Aging Process

(Justin Deschamps) Aging is related to how the body repairs itself. This self-repair ability is tied to gut bacteria due to the fact these microorganisms are instrumental in the production of nutrients along with the mechanism by which we absorb vitamins and release toxins in the digestive tract. The following study looked at the effect of transferring healthy gut bacteria to an unhealthy subject, observing that changes took place that reduced the effects of aging. 

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Study: One Apple Carries Roughly 100 Million Bacteria — Which Is A Good Thing

(John Anderer) How does the old saying go? “100 million bacteria a day will keep the doctor away?” Sounds about right. A new study reveals that a typical 240g apple contains around 100 million bacteria, mostly in the seeds and skin. While that may sound a bit off-putting at first, researchers say that when it comes to gut health, the more bacteria the better.

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What’s in Your Gut? Scientists Have Mapped the Gut Microbiome Landscape

(Jhoanna Robinson) A recent study, which was published in the journal The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), provided a glimpse of how microbial communities in the gut – known collectively as the gut microbiome – are spatially placed, revealing an unusual degree of mixing among different bacterial members.

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Psychobiotics: Bacteria For Your Brain?

(Kelly Brogan, M.D.) Every functional medicine psychiatrist has case stories of the “probiotic cure” – of a patient with debilitating symptoms, often obsessive compulsive range, whose symptoms remitted completely with dietary change and probiotic supplementation. Is this voodoo or is it based on a growing understanding of the role of the microbiome in mental health and behavior?

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