Appalachian “Apple Hunter” Finds and Rescues 1200 Lost Varieties

Appalachian “Apple Hunter” Finds and Rescues 1200 Lost Varieties

By Author: 

In a world where nearly everything has been genetically modified, this 80-year-old man searches high and low for nearly extinct heirloom apple trees – many the last of their kind – and reintroduces them to the world.

The number of commercially available apple varieties in the United States plummeted from 14,000 in 1905 to a measly 100 in less than a century… and only 11 of those varieties are commonly found in grocery stores.

That may seem like plenty to choose from, but when retired chemical engineer Tom Brown learned that an estimated 11,000 American varieties had gone extinct, he made it his life’s mission to save whatever was left of our country’s rich apple heritage.

Nicknamed the “Apple Hunter” by friends, he has scoured countless hilltops and valleys along the Appalachian mountain range, from Georgia to Pennsylvania, looking for “lost” heirloom varieties.

A modern “Johnny Appleseed,” he’s located and reintroduced 1200 so far, most of which haven’t been sold commercially for over a century, and many of which he cloned from the last known tree of its kind.

One of Brown’s most prized apples is the Junaluska apple.

“Legend has it the variety was standardized by Cherokee Indians in the Smoky Mountains more than two centuries ago and named after its greatest patron, an early-19th-century chief,” Atlas Obscura reports.

Once a Southern favorite, it disappeared around 1900. Detective work helped him locate the rural orchard, which closed in 1859.

Brown enlisted the help of a local hobby-orchardist and mailman, who spent days knocking door-to-door looking for clues. Finally, an elderly woman led them to a single, gnarled Junaluska tree in the ruins of a old mountain orchard since swallowed by forest.

As Brown discovered more and more lost apple varieties, he began to research where they all came from and why they had disappeared.

He learned the vast number of varieties was rooted in the early colonists’ taste for fermented beverages.

“Water wasn’t always safe to drink, and episodes of sickness from contaminated water gave that substance a questionable reputation,” explains William Kerrigan, author of Johnny Appleseed and the American Orchard.

Importing wine was expensive, and native pests killed Old World grapes. Apple orchards were easier to maintain than barley fields for beer, so cider became the go-to beverage.

By the mid-1700s, virtually every East Coast homestead had an apple orchard.

“A diverse orchard was fundamental to survival and good-eating alike,” says Brown.

“The goal was to be able to pick fresh apples from June to November, and have a diverse supply of fruit throughout the year.” Thick-skinned, late-ripening varieties provided wintertime treats. Others were fried, baked, dehydrated, used to make vinegar and finish livestock.

“Apples were the garden’s crown jewels,” says Appalachian Food Summit founder and chef, Travis Milton. “People took pride in having something unique to brag about to their neighbors.”

But the unique jewels were displaced by urbanization, factory farming, and corporate food systems.

“Conglomerates negotiated national contracts and switched to apples that matured fast and were suited to long-distance shipping. By 1950, most smaller orchards had been forced out of business,” Atlas Obscura reports.

“It upset me to learn about that,” Brown said. “Two-hundred-fifty years of culinary culture had been squandered. These were foods that people had once cared about deeply, that’d been central to their lives. It felt wrong to just let them die.”

Brown now drives 30,000 miles a year looking for lost apples and spends the rest of the time integrating them into his orchard, Heritage Apples.

The two-acre orchard in Clemmons, North Carolina, contains 700 of the rarest varieties, including Black Winesap, Candy Stripe, Royal Lemon, Rabun Bald, Yellow Bellflower, Neverfail, and Night Dropper.

He sells about 1000 of his saplings each year, helping pay for his apple hunting expeditions and helping spread their seeds around the country to ensure their survival.

Non-profits have helped him establish other reclaimed varieties at additional orchards, to which he donates scionwood for grafting.

“Tom has helped redefine what’s possible,” says Foggy Ridge Cider owner and James Beard Award winner Diane Flynt.

Heirloom apples like Hewes Virginia Crab and Arkansas Black are to Appalachia what noble grape varieties like Merlot or Cabernet Sauvignon are to France, she says.

“Saving an apple from the brink of extinction is a miraculous feeling,” says Brown. “It’s incredibly rewarding—and incredibly addictive!”

You can buy one of Brown’s apple trees from his website.

Author: Sara Burrows

Why Aeroponic Farming Is the Agricultural Wave of the Future

Why Aeroponic Farming Is the Agricultural Wave of the Future

BY ANDREW KROSOFSKY

Derived from the Greek word for air, aeroponic farming is similar in many ways to other soilless growing techniques like hydroponics. Yet, while this method still relies on a nutrient-rich delivery system, aeroponics is unique for its ability to grow faster, more plentifully, and using less water than many other growing methods. But what makes aeroponics so special, in the first place? And how does it actually work?

Aeroponic Farming

What is aeroponic farming?

In short, aeroponic farming is the growing of fruits and vegetables without necessitating the need for soil. According to Living Greens Farm, aeroponic farming was first developed for academic purposes in the 1920s. Without soil, students were able to properly examine root growth in real-time. Meanwhile, NASA saw the potential in this new growing method, and by the late ’90s, NASA had begun using it as a way for growing food in space — a locale that is notoriously bereft of soil.

Not many advances have been made since those days, mind you, but as we continue to degrade the huge swaths of previously fertile soil and attempt to feed the world’s 8 billion people, aeroponic farming is beginning to get a bit more attention.

Aeroponics Vs Hydroponics: Know the differences!

How does aeroponic farming work?

Aeroponic farming works by delivering nutrients to plants not via soil but via a nutrient-rich mist, distributed to the roots via a pre-programmed mister. Instead of using a growing medium, as you would within a hydroponic setup, roots grown in aeroponic systems are left floating in midair. According to Modern Farmer, however, the seeds for plants grown in aeroponic systems still need to germinate and sprout in a growing medium before being transferred.

MightyVine Tomatoes are Mighty Good | Pantry to Plate

Why is aeroponic farming good for the environment?

The reason for aeroponics’ increased popularity has to do with the many ecological advantages it has over other devices or growing systems. According to Living Greens Farm, aeroponic systems take up a remarkable 98 percent less land than the rainforest-destroying farming techniques our species is currently employing. These systems also use about 98 percent less water than other standard farming and are more energy-efficient.

Because they are grown indoors, in light, temperature, and water-regulated conditions, plants grown through hydroponics are safer for human consumption. They are also free from the potential soil and pesticide compounds found in traditional produce. They might even have a higher yield than outdoor crops and grow at a rate three times faster.

Local Tower Garden Farmer Produces Aeroponic Food for Disney, Emeril's, and other Fine Orlando ...

Can aeroponic farming be done at home?

With the right equipment, you can absolutely build a working aeroponic system at home. Many of these systems are already commercially available and can be purchased as complete set-ups, but you can make your own with the right know-how and materials found at your local garden or hardware store.

Hydroponic Herb Garden- A Guide To Design Your Herb Garden

Small Scale Gardener has instructions for building two different types of aeroponic systems in one’s home. The two systems are described as the single bucket system and the multi bucket system. The former is typically used for new gardeners or those who are looking to explore aeroponics as a hobby, the latter is a more advanced setup for small-scale farmers.

Aeroponic farming at home is versatile enough that you can grow herbs such as basil, ginger, rosemary, sage, oregano, mustard, or mint, as well as fruits and veggies like eggplant, lettuce, watermelon, broccoli, beets, onions. cucumber, cauliflower, cabbage, grapes, peas, peppers, potatoes, and radishes.


After thoughts by Rev Kat –

With today’s uncertainties about Federal owned and/or subsidized GMO farms, blockades and delivery strikes, growing your own produce or getting involved with community farms may be societies best shot for healthy, pesticide free foods that’s far more nutritional.

An added benefit to growing your own food is the positive energy you put into your home farming efforts. Your food could actually be healthier for you!

Check out the additional articles below for ideas on how to start your own garden of delights.

“We’ve got to get ourselves back to the garden”(Woodstock by Joni Mitchell)

15 Benefits of Aeroponic Growing

More from Green Matters

REMINDER – Elizabeth McQuade’s Remote Viewing Class – Nature Restoration Group

REMINDER this Saturday!

Have you been wanting to try Remote Viewing or have you done some remote viewing and want to try some different techniques and get more live practice? Then this free workshop is for you.

Saturday, May 15 at 1:00 Mountain Time
3:00 pm Eastern / 12:00 Noon Pacific / 8:00 pm GMT, London UK
7 am (Auckland, New Zealand, Sunday, May 16)
5 am (Sidney, Australia, Sunday, May 16)

Duration: 1.5 hours

Join PFC Volunteer Elizabeth McQuade for an enticing adventure of fun and intrigue as she teaches her remote viewing class. Elizabeth McQuade studied with Dr. Russell Targ in New Zealand who trained US military in Remote Viewing.  She will take you through some of the exercises he shared and some extra ones she has picked up along the way so you can see that you can remote view too!

It is more important than ever that we as a species start to expand our awareness and understand our innate abilities so that we can make better and more informed choices as a species moving forward. Connecting and embracing our extrasensory abilities is an essential part of our evolution.

We can’t keep doing the same things over and over and expect a different outcome. Now is the time to learn, grow, expand and connect to our higher wisdom and abilities!

A couple things to do before then.

1.   For the workshop we will be using Zoom.  If you don’t already have the Zoom app on your device or computer please search on Google for “free Zoom App” for the type of device you have and download that onto the device you want to use.  You don’t need to have a camera on your end but you will want to be able to see Elizabeth on a screen for some of the exercises.

2.   Click on the link you will receive via email anytime between 12:50 pm and 1:00 pm Mountain time (10 minutes before the start in your time zone) to join before the workshop starts.

3.   If possible find a quiet area where you will not be disturbed for the duration of the workshop.

4.   Mark it on your calendar.

5.   Have a pencil and paper handy as you will need it for some of the exercises.

6.   Before the workshop it is best to avoid alcohol or other substances that may affect your ability to tune in.

About the instructor:

Elizabeth McQuade has been doing Holistic Healing and Intuitive messages since 2009 and is passionate about assisting other adults, children and animals to achieve a higher state of balance, frequency and overall health and to assist in expanding people’s awareness of how their body, mind, emotions, intuition and energy fields work.  You can find out more about her at www.elizabethmcquade.com

In light, love and joy,

Elizabeth

The Benefits of Meditation for Children and a Steiner Education – Sade Lyn

Prepare for Change will be regularly featuring reposts from our Nature Restoration Website. Our Nature Restoration Group is a group of Earth Loving humans who are passionate about healing humanity and the planet. We meet every two weeks on Sundays. Our members share ideas and solutions at our meetings, as well as post on our website and facilitate workshops and classes.

Our next meeting will be taking place this coming Sunday, May 16, 2021 at 11:30 AM EDT (New York) time.

For more information about our group and to receive an invite to our next meeting email Shari at shari@prepareforchange.net

To visit our website go to naturerestoration.info

Our Feature Author for this month is Sade Lyn.

The Benefits of Meditation for Children

Several studies have been conducted that suggest children who practice mindfulness develop positive traits such as increased self control and better attention in class. They also tend to have more empathy for others.

Many children have a natural feel for meditation. Here are some more benefits:

• Enhanced focus
• Fostering compassion/self esteem
• Boosting confidence Building happiness.

Some schools are actually replacing detention time with meditation in the USA. Suspensions decreased by 70% over a 4 year period.

Source: https://mindworks.org

Meditation can reduce stress and anxiety. Teaching children to focus on their breath can benefit them in order to come back to a calm state. Outdoors is a good way to help children experience the calming beauty of nature. A few minutes of meditation a day can have excellent benefits. Doing this on a regular basis can change the brain. Brain centers for emotions and executive functioning can be changed and help children in a variety of ways.

Source: Thriveglobal.com/healthline.com

HOW TO MEDITATE

Find a quiet location.

Be in a comfortable position such as sitting or lying down.

Focus of attention and open attitude.

Allow the child to take deep breaths and focus on something that brings the child happiness.

Encourage them to imagine good things such as being with family and friends or enjoying themselves in the sunshine. They can think about their favorite holiday destination with the beautiful sea and sand or maybe a tree house where they can create magical things in the tree house. Guide the child to create anything they want with their imagination and put feeling into their thoughts. Guide the child and ask them how they feel when they are imagining all these wonderful things. Use words such as happiness, peace, and joy.

Visualize light all around the body and hum the mantra UMMM which is the sound of light and resonance which will restore harmony. You can do this for 1 minute.

Take deep breaths and end with the code word Namaste.

Recommended time frames for meditation:
Pre school children: A few minutes per day.
Grade school children: 3-10 minutes twice a day.

The Magic of Waldorf and a Steiner Education

Rudolf Steiner was an Austrian philosopher, social reformer, architect, esotericist and clairvoyant.

Waldorf education provides education that allows children to become free human beings and help to incarnate their spiritual identity as beings of body, soul and spirit.

The first Steiner school opened in 1919 for children of workers at the Waldorf Astoria cigarette factory. The schools benefactor was Emil Mott, a managing director who asked Dr Rudolf Steiner to found and lead the school in its early stages.

Steiner schools take children from 3 years to eighteen years of age.

Steiner education works for all children of any class, ethnicity, religion and academic ability.

The core subjects of the curriculum are taught in thematic blocks and all lessons include a balance of artistic, practical and intellectual content.

Website: steinerwaldorf.org

Waldorf schools by continent:

• North America- 202
• Africa- 21
• Central America- 17
• South America- 62
• Asia- 65
• Europe- 803
• Oceania- 69

Kindergarten

• North America- 180
• Africa- 18
• Central America- 17
• South America- 90
• Asia- 146
• Europe- 1355
• Oceania- 51

Remote Viewing Workshop with Elizabeth McQuade – Nature Restoration Group

A Workshop Presentation from PFC’s Nature Restoration Group volunteer Elizabeth McQuade.

Have you been wanting to try Remote Viewing or have you done some remote viewing and want to try some different techniques and get more live practice? Then this free workshop is for you.

Saturday, May 15 at 1:00 Mountain Time
3:00 pm Eastern / 12:00 Noon Pacific / 8:00 pm GMT, London UK
7 am (Auckland, New Zealand, Sunday, May 16)
5 am (Sidney, Australia, Sunday, May 16)

Duration: 1.5 hours

To receive the ZOOM link invitation please email Elizabeth at elizabethmcquadesessions@gmail.com.

Elizabeth McQuade studied with Dr. Russell Targ in New Zealand who trained US military in Remote Viewing.  She will take you through some of the exercises he shared and some extra ones she has picked up along the way so you can see that you can remote view too!

It is more important than ever that we as a species start to expand our awareness and understand our innate abilities so that we can make better and more informed choices as a species moving forward. Connecting and embracing our extrasensory abilities is an essential part of our evolution.

We can’t keep doing the same things over and over and expect a different outcome. Now is the time to learn, grow, expand and connect to our higher wisdom and abilities!

A couple things to do before then.

1.   For the workshop we will be using Zoom.  If you don’t already have the Zoom app on your device or computer please search on Google for “free Zoom App” for the type of device you have and download that onto the device you want to use.  You don’t need to have a camera on your end but you will want to be able to see Elizabeth on a screen for some of the exercises.

2.   Click on the link you will receive via email anytime between 12:50 pm and 1:00 pm Mountain time (10 minutes before the start in your time zone) to join before the workshop starts.

3.   If possible find a quiet area where you will not be disturbed for the duration of the workshop.

4.   Mark it on your calendar.

5.   Have a pencil and paper handy as you will need it for some of the exercises.

6.   Before the workshop it is best to avoid alcohol or other substances that may affect your ability to tune in.

About the instructor:

Elizabeth McQuade has been doing Holistic Healing and Intuitive messages since 2009 and is passionate about assisting other adults, children and animals to achieve a higher state of balance, frequency and overall health and to assist in expanding people’s awareness of how their body, mind, emotions, intuition and energy fields work.  You can find out more about her at www.elizabethmcquade.com

In light, love and joy,

Elizabeth

REMINDER – “Return of the Top Predator” class Saturday, May 8th

REMINDER

The Prepare for Change Nature Restoration Group is inviting you to join Antoine for a monthly class / talk about forestry and nature. Each month Antoine from le Rêve de Gaia Foundation holds a ZOOM class that elaborates on his most recent post in the Nature and Our Planet section of our website naturerestoration.info. During his class, he gives a short presentation followed by a delightful question and answer session.

Antoine and Margot from Le Rêve de Gaia

Saturday 8 may at 17.30 Paris time

This Saturday the topic will be

“Return of the Top Predator”

We will discuss the impact of wildlife on our lives as a human being and the importance to have a large variety in biodiversity.

This talk will start with a story about how Antoine lost his sheep to the wolf.

A little presentation with some photo’s to visualize problems and solutions and of course a Q&A.

Request an invitation to the group by sending an Email to shari@prepareforchange.net with your name, email address, and reason for participation. You will receive an email reply with the zoom link prior to the meeting.

Once a member of the group, you will receive weekly notices of the calls and topics of discussion.

USA Times: 11:30 AM EDT/ 10:30AM CDT/ 9:30 AM MDT/ 8:30 AM PDT
Paris Time: 17:30 

 

Nature and Our Planet Talk Series – Return of the Top Predator

The Prepare for Change Nature Restoration Group is inviting you to join Antoine for a monthly class / talk about forestry and nature. Each month Antoine from le Rêve de Gaia Foundation holds a ZOOM class that elaborates on his most recent post in the Nature and Our Planet section of our website naturerestoration.info. During his class, he gives a short presentation followed by a delightful question and answer session.

Saturday 8 may at 17.30 Paris time

This Saturday the topic will be

“Return of the Top Predator”

We will discuss the impact of wildlife on our lives as a human being and the importance to have a large variety in biodiversity.

This talk will start with a story about how Antoine lost his sheep to the wolf.

A little presentation with some photo’s to visualize problems and solutions and of course a Q&A.

Request an invitation to the group by sending an Email to shari@prepareforchange.net with your name, email address, and reason for participation. You will receive an email reply with the zoom link prior to the meeting.

Once a member of the group, you will receive weekly notices of the calls and topics of discussion.

USA Times: 11:30 AM EDT/ 10:30AM CDT/ 9:30 AM MDT/ 8:30 AM PDT
Paris Time: 17:30 

 

 

My Natural First Aid Kit – Patricia White, RN – Nature Restoration Group

Prepare for Change will be regularly featuring reposts from our Nature Restoration Website. Our Nature Restoration Group is a group of Earth Loving humans who are passionate about healing humanity and the planet. We meet every two weeks on Sundays. Our members share ideas and solutions at our meetings, as well as post on our website and facilitate workshops and classes.

For more information about our group and to receive an invite to our next meeting email Shari at shari@prepareforchange.net

To visit our website go to naturerestoration.info

My Natural First Aid Kit

Our fast-paced societies have numerous options ready made to aid in the event of unforeseen illness or injury. Namely pharmaceuticals or a trip to the doctor’s office. Planning ahead can be incredibly valuable. And simple home remedies can play a vital role in easing symptoms and providing immediate help. I think Nature has an answer for everything that ales us. I want share remedies I have found effective and routinely use in my home. I hope that my list will inspire you to research and build your own natural apothecary.

Calamine lotion I use for poison oak which I have had twice in the last 6 months because I have a new yard to play in. It helps with itching and dries out the lesions. I use peppermint oil first and then apply the calamine. It still takes a week to heal, but without the itch. Apply twice daily. Yes. One application will give you up to 12 hours of relief.

Peppermint oil is great for indigestion, respiratory congestion, colds and flu. It can alleviate pain and itching and fight infections. It can be taken internally, diffused, and topically. (only buy 100% therapeutic grade oil) I gave my friend some therapeutic grade peppermint oil to put on her abscessed tooth and it immediately took away the pain and continued to alleviate the pain, with routine application, until she got a root canal. This is one of my favorite remedies because it works for so many things. Be careful when you are using a pure essential oil. Dilute 1 to 2 drops with a dab of coconut oil for skin applications otherwise it could burn the skin with repeated usage. When making a medicinal tea use only 1 drop of peppermint oil. (powerful)

Eucalyptus oil I like to use to clean with. It has antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties. It will break up congestion and help you breathe better.  It can stop a cough. And it’s an excellent bug repellant.

Tea Tree oil I like to use to clean with. It has strong antibiotic and antifungal properties and makes an excellent disinfectant, antiperspirant, and all-purpose cleaner. I like to make antibacterial liquid soap with this. Using ½ castile soap, 1/2 water and several drops of tea tree oil. If it is 100% therapeutic then you won’t need more than 10 drops. You can make a hand sanitizer with witch hazel and Tea Tree oil. It is a good bug repellant. It also has anti-inflammatory properties and is a good application for skin infections.

Baking soda can also be used as a cleaning agent. It has antibacterial and antifungal properties. When ingested it can alleviate heartburn, (UTI) urinary tract infections, muscle pain, improve pH and kidney function. This is my go-to when I have the first signs of a UTI. I will take 1/2 tsp in 4 oz of water twice daily for 3 days. My symptoms disappear immediately after the first dose. I also abstain from sugar and high acid foods for those 3 days.

Arnica gel is a powerful anti-inflammatory. I broke my toe while away at a retreat and someone gave me arnica gel to put on the injury. I was amazed at how quickly it soothed the pain and eliminated the swelling. It is excellent for sprains, bruising, arthritis and inflammation. Arnica should never be taken internally.

Lemons are a tasty way to improve your bodies pH. Great for a hangover or if you have overindulged in a high acid meal. They boost immunity, fight cancer, prevent kidney stones, promote skin health and promote weight loss. I recommended lemons to a friend whose fingers were freezing up on her due to arthritis. She has 1 or 2 lemons daily and her fingers are now limber. She has been doing this daily for over a year now and doesn’t mind sharing her home remedy/miracle cure with the world.

Manuka Honey has antimicrobial properties and now is being used in Medicine to treat wounds, burns and skin infections. Also good for sore throats and can help with digestion. Can help with a cough or cold when mixed with apple cider vinegar or lemon.

Apple Cider Vinegar can help detox the liver, purify the blood, cleanse lymph nodes and boost immunity. It can lower cholesterol, stabilize blood sugar and relieve acid reflux. It can help with weight loss and lowering blood pressure. It can stop hiccups, improve body pH, and relieve cold symptoms. It is great for sunburns and can be used to treat other skin problems like poison ivy or oak. It has antimicrobial properties and can be used as a disinfectant. I use white vinegar to clean with and as a weed killer.

Chamomile makes a lovely tea. I like to buy the flowers by the pound and use a French Press to make my tea. Better quality and less cost. Chamomile fight’s anxiety and depression, improves digestion and due to its high antioxidant content is cancer fighting. It is a powerful pain reliever and anti-inflammatory. I use it regularly as a sleep aid or to destress after work and before bedtime.

Ale vera soothes rashes, burns and skin irritations. Is high in zinc and boosts the immune system. Another antimicrobial skin conditioner.

Cloves are high in antioxidants and kill bacteria, they support liver function and bone health. They regulate blood sugar and protect against cancer, I love them! I became a vegetarian in 2014 and shortly thereafter started having dental problems. I have a lot of amalgams. I chew on one or two of them in place of candy or gum. They have the added benefit of freshening your breath. They were actually used in ancient times to do just that. Cloves have a numbing effect and can reduce pain. Clove oil is often used for mouth pain.

Epsom salts can reduce pain and swelling when you soak in it, either via bath or individual limbs. People who suffer from magnesium deficiency may improve their sleep and relaxation. I use it to alleviate constipation. 2 tsp in 6 oz of water. One dose is all I need to set things right.

Lavender is another one of my favorite remedies. It is a natural antioxidant and can boost your mood and alleviate stress. It has been proven to boost cognitive function in Alzheimer patients. It has antimicrobial and pain-relieving properties and is an excellent application for the skin. It will help tension headaches, improve sleep and relaxation. I use it to make antibacterial soap and for massage. Occasionally I apply it to my face with a carrier oil or cream as a daily moisturizing cream. When I have to put on a mask the smell is incredible.

Witch Hazel is an astringent that can cleanse soothe and treat inflamed irritated and broken skin. It contains antioxidants that prevent widespread inflammation and neutralize free radicals. It tightens your pores, reduces redness and has antiviral properties. It is excellent for any type of skin irritation. It is an effective treatment for hemorrhoids. I use it to cleanse my hands in place of hand sanitizer. I like it because it does not dry out my hands the way the alcohol-based hand sanitizers do. I also use it occasionally to clean my face. It’s a good extractor for herbal skin tincture remedies. My next herbal project is to make a licorice tincture, using witch hazel as the solvent, for age spots. I hear it works really well.

Oregano oil can be used in place of antibiotics for a number of concerns. Bacterial infections, fungal infections, parasites, viruses, inflammation, allergies, tumors, candida, and indigestion. It belongs to the mint family and has some of the same digestive healing properties as peppermint. It can be taken internally, diffused, and topically. (only buy 100% therapeutic grade oil) Dilute in water for internal and diffused and dilute in coconut oil for topical applications. I keep it on hand for cold and flu season and food preservation. This is a powerful natural broad-spectrum antibiotic.

Clay and Activated Charcoal have the amazing ability to absorb everything from bacteria and viruses to toxic dugs and radioactive substances. Both can be used on the skin to draw out poisons or foreign bodies. Charcoal can be taken internally to eliminate bloating and gas, it is an excellent absorbent of toxins. If taken internally drink plenty of water with this treatment and note your stools will be black. Charcoal can be used as a room deodorizer, it absorbs odors.

Written by: Patricia White, RN, Detoxification Specialist