Studies Show Having Plants Around Reduces Stress And Improves Cognitive Skills

(John Vibes) According to a study published by the American Society for Horticultural Science in December of 2019, having plants around your home or office could reduce your stress levels. In the study, 63 office workers at an electric company in Japan were monitored during their day to day activities to test how their pulse rates were affected by plants.

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Trees Communicate With One Another Through The “Underground Web”

(John Vibes) For decades, scientists have known that trees communicate with one another through a network of underground fungi, which even allows them to trade nutrients back and forth. This incredible discovery was first made by ecologist Suzanne Simard when she was researching her doctoral thesis over 20 years ago.

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Plant Talk: New Research Suggests Plants Hear and Respond to Sounds and Broadcast Ultrasounds of Their Own

(Sequoyah Kennedy) Do you talk to your plants? Do your plants talk back? They might, according to new research. Two new papers from Tel-Aviv University may suggest that plants are in fact capable of responding to sounds, and may even be able to communicate their physical condition by giving off ultrasound waves of their own.

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Ecologist Says Trees Talk to Each Other in a Language We Can Learn

(Azriel ReShel) A walk amongst the trees is rejuvenating, nourishing and healing, yet a forest is so much more than an amazing collection of trees. There is a lot going on in the forests that we can’t see. Ecologist Suzanne Simard says trees have a sophisticated and interconnected social network existing underground.

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What’s Happening To Trees—The Planet’s “Lungs”?

(Catherine J. Frompovich) Tropical rainforests, in particular, often are called the “lungs of the planet” because they take in carbon dioxide—the consensus establishment’s supposed culprit causing climate change.  Trees breathe out oxygen, their natural symbiotic relationship with humans. Shouldn’t we plant more trees?

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Rising CO2 Levels Are Re-Greening the Earth with Huge Gains in Forest Coverage Across the Earth’s Surface

(Isabelle Z.) If you pay attention to the mainstream media or you’ve suffered through the ramblings of the Hollywood elite, you’ve probably heard a common refrain: Carbon is the enemy. Blaming it for all the woes our environment is currently experiencing, they claim that if we could just reduce the carbon levels on our planet, all would be right with the world.

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Low-Maintenance Plants That Also Work as Air Purifiers In Your Home

Prone to killing plants? It’s time to turn a new leaf and not only improve the air quality of your home, but your plant watering skills as well. Improve your home’s air quality with some of the easy-to-care-for plants below.

Spider Plant

These plants remove various toxins from the air such as formaldehyde and xylene. Though this plant does require a little upkeep, all you have to do is trim the dead leaf tips off every once in a while when they start to turn brown. Spider plants are to be watered occasionally with room temperature water, and to be kept in indirect sunlight in a bright room that is 55-65 degrees Fahrenheit. Make sure the soil you buy for your spider plant drains well and that it is placed in a drainage pot. The Spider plant produces flowers that are usually white in colour.

Dracaena

Another low-maintenance plant that’s actually perfect for apartment living, a Dracaena removes toxins like benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene, and xylene. However, if you have any pets like dogs or cats, stay away. If your pet consumes this plant, it could make them sick. A Dracaena plant is best kept in a drainage pit with soil that drains well. For care, put in bright to moderate indirect sunlight and water it when the soil is dry to the touch. Place in a room from 65 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit. If a Dracaena plant looks droopy or seems to be yellow in colour, this means that it is over-watered or there is not enough drainage.

Peace Lily

Among other popular indoor plants, the Peace Lily eliminates toxins like ammonia, benzene, formaldehyde, and trichloroethylene. To keep your Peace Lily alive, store in indirect sunlight or even a shady area for maximum growth. Year round, you’ll have to keep the soil moist and keep the plant in a room above 60 degrees Fahrenheit. If your Peace Lily isn’t blooming flowers, it is not getting enough sunlight. Remember, no direct sunlight = happy Peace Lily. Avoid keeping a Peace Lily in a cold environment because it will not grow. Root rot is common among Peace Lilies, so make sure that you invest in a pot with good drainage.

Aloe Vera

Are you prone to both killing plants and getting sunburnt? Then owning an Aloe Vera plant is perfect for you. These plants remove a toxin called formaldehyde from the air. Keep your Aloe Vera plant in a drainage pot along with soil that drains well. It is best grown in indirect sunlight or artificial lighting. Water your Aloe Vera plant deeply but not too often.

Clean the air in your home and cure sunburn at the same time! The healing properties of Aloe Vera can do wonders. Once your plant reaches maturity, you can start harvesting the leaves for its cooling contents.

Orchids

A flowering plant by large, Orchids remove a toxin called xylene. When it comes down to watering upkeep, this plant is the best for those who are forgetful because Orchids only require water every 5-12 days, depending on the type. Orchids require shallow planting and should not be left sitting in water. They grow best when placed in indirect sunlight and in a room that is from 65 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit. Depending on the type of orchid, adjust the room temperature accordingly. For the record, most Orchids are best kept in humid environments.

Snake Plant

Removing a few toxins such as benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene, and xylene, the Snake plant, also known as the Sansevieria plant, can live in drier conditions than other plants. When watering, check every two to three weeks to see if the soil is dry. If it is, then water your Snake plant. Only use room-temperature water to water the plant. Not only does this plant require little sun but you can also let your Snake plant soak up some vitamin C from fluorescent lighting. Keep the plant in a room between 40-85 degrees Fahrenheit.

With so many plant options to choose from, you’ll be wanting more than one! “Go Green” with a plant air purifier and forget those pesky plants that always seem to die on you.