The Pandemic on Television

by Jon Rappoport

April 27, 2021

(To join our email list, click here.)

It should obvious to all but the most addled minds that television news anchors, their script writers, and editors never question the following (false) assertions:

SARS-CoV-2 is real. It was discovered and sequenced.

The test for the virus is accurate.

Every positive test denotes a “case of COVID-19.”

The case numbers and death numbers are accurate.

Masks, distancing, and lockdowns are necessary, in order to prevent further spread of the virus.

The COVID vaccine is safe and effective.

People who take the vaccine should nevertheless continue to wear masks and limit their exposure to non-family groups.

The mainstream news denizens accept these presumptions without investigation. They’re taking dictation from public health agencies (CDC, WHO).

Therefore, of what value is the news? Instead of elaborate broadcasts, why don’t the networks simply present, once a day, announcements from CDC spokespeople delivered from bland bureaucratic offices?

The answer, of course, is: commercials. Ad revenues. News divisions are expected to make money. They’re not public charities.

News is business.

Lester Holt (NBC) makes $10 million a year. Norah O’Donnell (CBS) makes $6 million a year. David Muir (ABC) makes $5 million a year. Wolf Blitzer (CNN) makes $5 million a year.

News also dresses up content. Instead of a CDC bureaucrat saying, “4000 new cases in Michigan today,” Norah can say, “ALARMING REPORT OF 4000 NEW CASES IN MICHIGAN,” with accompanying quick cuts of charts and graphs, footage of people waiting in line for the vaccine and lab workers fiddling with vials and EMT personnel wheeling a patient down a hospital corridor and Anthony Fauci sitting in the Oval Office across from Joe Biden.

Cut to the Michigan governor at a podium: “The pandemic is far from over. We have a lot of work to do…”

A general in full-dress uniform tells Norah, “Right now, we’re working on a vaccine that will protect against any virus, even ones we’ve never seen or discovered…”

For 60 seconds, two talking heads offer points of view on “the disproportionate dispensing of the vaccine to minority communities.”

A U of Michigan assistant athletic director speculates on whether home football this fall will be played in a packed stadium.

And “We’ll be back after this.”

COMMERCIALS. A drug that causes heart attacks. A drug that causes brain damage. A public service announcement for COVID vaccination. Chevy truck. Teaser for upcoming premiere of a new CBS cop show. One dollar special for double burger and fries and egg and bacon and cheese breakfast at McKing. Save money on your car insurance, click or call. Thick or thin crust, square or round pizza. A drug that makes your hair fall out. Tires that hold the road in the Arctic. Teaser for upcoming special: A Life Well Lived, the Man Who Changed America: Anthony Fauci.

And—back to the news.

That’s not hard work. It’s not intelligent work. It’s certainly not investigative work.

Truth be told, thousands of people could do it, could head up network television news coverage. The quality of American education aside, there are still MANY literate high school and college cheerleaders, drama majors, athletes, and self-assured nerds who could stand in for these high-priced anchors and deliver the goods.

If you peruse the bios of Lester Holt and David Muir, for example, you find they worked their up through positions as local anchors—meaning news readers. They also, up close and personal, “covered hot spots around the world.” Plane crashes, revolutions, hurricanes. In other words, they spoke with official sources in those places, and repeated the official versions of events, while standing under umbrellas whipping in the rain or on evening city rooftops wearing a Dan Rather-style bush jacket or flak jacket.

It goes without saying that network talent spotters are looking for young stars who are INCURIOUS. No digging beneath the surface on stories. Instead—shift horizontally across the top layer and find sweet spots that align with politically designated objectives, when necessary.

“I really like this kid in Cincinnati. He has good teeth, a strong jaw, and his hair looks like it’s made out of iron. Smooth baritone. Occasional self-effacing smile.”

“Yeah, I don’t know. He’s Clark Kent. Too straight.”

“We can work with that. Road trips. Send him to the Ukraine for a few weeks, Poland, El Salvador. Give him some seasoning. Hey, David Muir’s doing all right and he looks like he just stepped out of a men’s underwear catalog.”

“The Cincinnati kid played football at a small college in Nebraska. We could put him with the Bengals reporting on racial issues. That ought to give him a rough edge or two…”

“Wait. Here’s a red flag. Three months ago, he had this lawyer on his broadcast. The lawyer’s filing a suit against a university lab. Claims the COVID PCR test is spitting out false-positives like a fire hose.”

“Crap. Was it just a one-time screw-up?”

“No. Our boy tried to take it further. He brought a crew to the university lab. Got some quotes from techs there.”

“That’s not good. He’s an anchor and he thinks he’s making the news.”

Indeed, that isn’t good. Anchors don’t make news. They don’t ferret it out. They take what’s there and make it sound important.

You or I could go into a college drama department, stand in front of a hundred students, and say, “We’re looking for people who can read text without mistakes and make it sound important”—

And voila, we’d discover a few young men and women who could, with a few weeks of training, assume the role of a local TV news anchor and do a credible job.

In the history of television news, I know of two elite network anchors who—if not in their coverage of stories, but in their manner and attitude—transmitted a significant dissatisfaction with their roles, their limitations, and their virtual imprisonments: Peter Jennings and Jessica Savitch.

Jennings came across as “the man who knew more but wasn’t allowed to report it.” Savitch was a tiger caged at a circus, pacing back and forth in her cell, angry, wanting to rip the bars and jump out. Savitch died at 36, Jennings at 67.

Jennings managed to keep on his staff, for six years, an ACTUAL medical journalist, the late Nick Regush. Regush spent many hours digging below the surface. For example, in 1999, in a blistering ABC report, he expressed serious doubt that the Hepatitis C virus exists. After his departure from the network, he echoed that report:

“Consider this a challenge in progress. This scientific adventure raises the question of whether the hepatitis C virus, blamed for a major silent epidemic of liver disease and even cancer, actually exists. That’s right. You read this correctly: I am raising a question that may disturb scientists and hepatitis C patients alike. But I’m raising it anyway because it is vital to do so in the interests of public health. I’m issuing a challenge to the scientific community to present me with the published, peer-reviewed scientific evidence that such a virus actually exists—namely that it has been properly isolated, according to accepted, fundamental principles of virology.”

Were Regush working for ABC today, he would last about five minutes before being fired.

“Don’t DISCOVER news, RELAY it.”


The Matrix Revealed

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, The Matrix Revealed, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

Breitbart: China Urges W.H.O. to Let It Run Global ‘Vaccine Passport’ System

Terran note: Heglian Dialectic at its rawest.  Create the virus pandemic to install the surveillance…

https://www.breitbart.com/asia/2021/03/10/china-urges-who-let-it-run-global-vaccine-passport-system/

Chinese Communist Party “experts” urged the World Health Organization (W.H.O.) on Tuesday to let China build and run a global database for “vaccine passports” documenting if every person on earth has received a Chinese coronavirus vaccine.

The Communist Party launched its domestic “vaccine passport” system Wednesday, despite W.H.O. officials urging countries not to implement such a system due to unequal access to vaccines and the variety in the quality of the available offerings around the world. The “vaccine passport” — A digital certification that confirms a person has received a coronavirus vaccination — joins China’s larger “social credit system,” which judges every citizen and awards them numerical “scores” based on how much the Party approves of their behavior. The behavior judged can vary from littering and volunteering, which result in respectively lower or higher social credit scores, to the display of public opinions either in favor or against the Communist Party.

China’s social credit system has prevented millions of citizens from traveling through banning them from purchasing airplane, train, or public transportation tickets. China is similarly limiting citizens who do not receive a vaccine against the Chinese coronavirus from widespread travel.

China’s Global Times, a state-run propaganda newspaper, proposed Tuesday that the Communist Party could build an international “vaccine passport” surveillance system in a week through its large technology companies. The proposal appeared to be a response to the W.H.O. explicitly discouraging countries from creating such a system.

“Chinese experts noted on Tuesday that China can help by sharing its experience with and provide technical support to the WHO to organize the issue,” the Times reported, “as China is the most experienced country in using a health code system in the world while the WHO is the most proper organizer for the matter to ensure independence, fairness and data security.”

The regime-approved “experts” cited in the article argued that, since China has been conducting mass surveillance of its citizens, violating their human rights, for years, expanding that system to the rest of the world would not present a major technological challenge.

“In terms of technology, I believe that Chinese companies can build an international platform in just one week,” one of those experts, the head of a Chinese organization identified as the “Information Consumption Alliance,” claimed. “The WHO can draft the rules, procedures and data format. China is very willing to provide support in sharing experience and techniques in setting up such a platform as the country has rich experience in this.”

China’s participation in a global health surveillance program would “guarantee public trust,” the newspaper insisted.

The Global Times did not express significant confidence in the possibility of the W.H.O. agreeing to such a deal, though the U.N. health body has stood accused repeatedly throughout the pandemic of allowing China to dictate how it responds to the virus, including spreading disinformation claiming the highly contagious virus was not transmissible from person to person. Instead, the newspaper cited other Chinese government observers who suggested that, rather than wait for the W.H.O., China should pressure other countries into bilateral vaccine passport agreements. The agreements would hypothetically lift travel restrictions between China and the agreeing country for individuals who can show documentation proving they have received a coronavirus vaccination.

Chinese officials are reportedly attempting to convince the administration of President Joe Biden to recognize China’s homemade vaccines as effective to implement such a plan, in exchange for China recognizing American-made vaccines.

China has approved two vaccines against the Chinese coronavirus. The first, by the firm Sinovac Biotech, was found in studies to be 50.38 percent effective in halting infections. The second, by the Sinopharm company, tested at 72.51 percent efficacy. The United States has approved three vaccines. The first, by Pfizer, tested at 95 percent effectiveness and the second, by the Moderna company, tested at around 94 percent effective. The most recently approved vaccine, developed by Johnson & Johnson, is believed to be 66 percent effective against any infections, including mild ones.

The Communist Party hopes to convince countries that, unlike the United States, have approved the use of Chinese-made vaccines to lift travel restrictions on vaccinated Chinese citizens, the Global Times noted Tuesday.

“Chinese experts said it is very possible and practical for China to start mutual recognition with countries that had approved Chinese vaccines, such as Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia;” the publication reported, “or some neighboring countries that have practical needs for resuming exchanges, such as South Korea and Japan; or regional organizations such as the Association of Southeast Asian Nations; or any other country that is willing to cooperate.”

The growing global push out of Beijing for “vaccine passport” programs met with stern rejection from the World Health Organization on Monday. Dr. Michael Ryan, director of the W.H.O. Health Emergencies Program, warned that “real practical and ethical considerations” abound regarding the programs and urged countries not to consider them at the moment.

“Vaccination is just not available enough around the world and is not available certainly on an equitable basis,” Ryan contended, which would lead to “inequity and unfairness … further branded into the system.”China’s “vaccine passport” program launched this week operates through WeChat, a Chinese government-controlled social medium that the regime heavily censors and uses to monitor its citizens. Individuals vaccinated will have QR codes available on WeChat that allow other nations to confirm their vaccination status. At press time, no other nation has agreed to access the certification, though Chinese officials will likely use the program to limit domestic travel.

Dictator Xi Jinping has attempted to sell the QR code system publicly since at least November. That month, Xi attended the virtual annual gathering of G20 nations, urging fellow countries to buy into China’s app program.

“We hope more countries will join this mechanism. We need to further standardize policies and establish fast tracks to facilitate the orderly flow of people,” Xi told fellow world leaders.

China already heavily restricts travel through the “social credit” system. The state brands individuals with low social credit “untrustworthy” and bans them from buying tickets to travel, even within the country, if their score is too low. As of March 2019, Chinese state media boasted that over 13 million people no longer had the right to travel within China thanks to that system.

“As of March, 13.49 million individuals have been classified as untrustworthy and rejected access to 20.47 million plane tickets and 5.71 million high-speed train tickets for being dishonest,” the Global Times reported in May of that year, without elaborating on the offending “dishonesty.”

Human rights activists around the world have warned that China uses the social credit system to limit the rights of political dissidents, religious groups, and others considered a threat to communism, rather than just individuals with records of crime.

<