It’s the Flu Fear Propaganda Season All Over Again

Do you know flu propaganda when you see it? As Dr. Robert Scott Bell, of The Robert Scott Bell Show, contends, the great “flu fear” propaganda campaign is in full swing already.

Indeed, it seems the push to make people afraid and go get their flu shots starts earlier every year. U.S. health officials recently revealed that there were two “major health scares” at stateside airports.

Channel News Asia reports that two inbound flights involving passengers who were returning from the Haj, which is the Muslim pilgrimage to the holy city of Mecca in Saudi Arabia, were part of an alleged health scare.

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Indigenous people invented the so-called ‘American Dream’

When President Barack Obama created Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the 2012 program that offered undocumented young people brought to the U.S. as children a path into society, for a moment the ideals of the American Dream seemed, at least for this group, real.

We call these kids, many of whom are now adults, “Dreamers,” because they are chasing the American Dream – a national aspiration for upward economic mobility built on physical mobility. Fulfilling your dreams often means following them wherever they may lead – even into another country.

The Trump administration’s decision to cancel DACA – which is currently on hold while it is litigated in the courts – and build a U.S.-Mexico border wall has endangered those dreams by subjecting 800,000 young people to deportation.

But the notion underlying both Trump’s DACA repeal and the wall – which is that “illegal” immigrants, most of them from Mexico, are stealing U.S. jobs and hurting society – reflects a profound misunderstanding of American history.

On Indigenous Peoples Day, it’s worth underscoring something that many archaeologists know: Many of the values that inspire the American Dream – liberty, equality and the pursuit of happiness – date back to well before the creation of the U.S.-Mexico border and before freedom-seeking Pilgrim immigrants arrived at Plymouth Rock in 1620.

They originate with native North Americans.

A Native American dream

The modern rendition of the American Dream can be traced back to 1774, when Virginia’s governor, John Murray, the fourth earl of Dunmore, wrote that even if Americans “attained Paradise, they would move on if they heard of a better place farther west.”

The actual term “American Dream” was popularized in 1931 by the businessman and historian James Truslow Adams. For him, its realization depended on not just being able to better oneself but also, through movement and human interaction, seeing your neighbors bettered as well.

The first peoples to come to the Americas also came in search of a better life.

That happened 14,000 years ago in the last Ice Age when nomadic pioneers, ancestors to modern Native Americans and First Nations, arrived from the Asian continent and roamed freely throughout what now comprises Canada, the United States and Mexico. Chasing mammoth, ancient bison and the elephant-like Gomphothere, they moved constantly to secure the health of their communities.

The indigenous communities of the Americas knew none of these modern-day national borders. USGS 

A more recent example of the power of migration reappears about 5,000 years ago, when a large group of people from what is today central Mexico spread into the American Southwest and farther north, settling as far up as western North America. With them they brought corn, which now drives a significant part of the American economy, and a way of speaking that birthed over 30 of the 169 contemporary indigenous languages still spoken in the United States today.

The Hohokam

This globalist world view was alive and well 700 years ago as well when people from what is now northern Arizona fled a decades-long drought and rising authoritarianism under religious leaders.

Many migrated hundreds of miles south to southern Arizona, joining the Hohokam – ancestors to modern O’odham nations – who had long thrived in the harsh Sonoran desert by irrigating vast fields of agave, corn, squash, beans and cotton.

When the northern migrants arrived to this hot stretch of land around the then-nonexistent U.S.-Mexico frontier, Hohokam religious and political life was controlled by a handful of elites. Social mechanisms restricting the accumulation of power by individuals had slowly broken down.

For decades after their arrival, migrants and locals interacted. From that exchange, a Hohokam cultural revolution grew. Together, the two communities created a commoners’ religious social movement that archaeologists call Salado, which featured a feasting practice that invited all village members to participate.

As ever more communities adopted this equitable tradition, political power – which at the time was embedded in religious power – became more equally spread through society.

Elites lost their control and, eventually, abandoned their temples.

America’s egalitarian mound-builders

The Hohokam tale unearths another vaunted American ideal that originates in indigenous history: equality.

Long before it was codified in the Declaration of Independence,, equality was enacted through the building of large mounds.

Massive earthen structures like these are often acts of highly hierarchical societies – think of the pyramids of the ancient Egyptians, constructed by masses of laborers as the final resting place of powerful pharaohs, or those of the rigid, empire-building Aztecs.

But great power isn’t always top-down. Poverty Point, in the lower Mississippi River Valley of what’s now Louisiana, is a good example. This massive site, which consists of five mounds, six concentric semi-elliptical ridges and a central plaza, was built some 4,000 years ago by hunter-fisher-gatherers with little entrenched hierarchy.

Poverty Point: a city built on cooperation. Herb Roe/WikipediaCC BY-SA

Originally, archaeologists believed that such societies without the inequality and authoritarianism that defined the ancient Egyptian, Roman, and Aztec empires could not have constructed something so significant – and, if so, only over decades or centuries.

But excavations in the last 20 years have revealed that large sections of Poverty Point were actually constructed in only a few months. These Native Americans organized in groups to undertake massive projects as a communal cooperative, leaving a built legacy of equality across America’s landscape.

The consensus-building Haudenosaunee

The Haudenosaunee, or Iroquois, offer a more modern example of such consensus-based decision-making practices.

These peoples – who’ve lived on both sides of the St. Lawrence river in modern-day Ontario and the U.S. Great Lakes states for hundreds, if not thousands, of years – built their society on collective labor arrangements.

They ostracized people who exhibited “selfish” behavior, and women and men often worked together in large groups. Everyone lived together in communal longhouses. Power was also shifted constantly to prevent hierarchy from forming, and decisions were made by coalitions of kin groups and communities.

Many of these participatory political practices continue to this day.

The Haudenosaunee sided with the British during the 1776 American Revolution and were largely driven off their land after the war. Like many native populations, the Haudenosaunee Dream turned into a nightmare of invasion, plague and genocide as European migrants pursued their American Dream that excluded others.

Native Americans at Standing Rock

The long indigenous history of rejecting authoritarianism continues, including the 2016 battle for environmental justice at Standing Rock, South Dakota.

There, a resistance movement coalesced around a horizontally organized youth group that rejected the planned Dakota Access oil pipeline.

Native American pioneers continue to fight for the same ideals that inspire the American Dream, including equality and freedom. John Duffy/WikimediaCC BY-SA

The movement centered on an environmental cause in part because nature is sacred to the Lakota – and to many other indigenous communities – but also because communities of color often bear the brunt of economic and urban development decisions.

Standing Rock was the indigenous fight against repression and for the American Dream, gone 21st century.

Redefining the North American dream

Anthropologists and historians haven’t always recognized the quintessentially Native American ideals present in the American Dream.

In the early 19th century, the prominent social philosopher Lewis Henry Morgan called the Native Americans he studied “savages.” And for centuries, America’s native peoples have seen their cultural heritage attributed to seemingly everyone but their ancestors – even to an invented “lost” white race.

America’s indigenous past was not romantic. There were petty disputes, bloody intergroup conflicts and slavery, namely along the Northwest Coast and American Southeast.

But the ideals of freedom and equality – and the right that Americans can move across this vast continent to seek it out – survive through the millennia. Societies based on those values have prospered here.

So the next time a politician invokes American values to promote a policy of closed borders or selfish individualism, remember who originally espoused the American Dream – and first sought to live it, too.

Source: https://theconversation.com

For the organic farmer: Cattle manure is best for crop growth

(Natural News) A study, published in Horticultural Science, compared the effects of different organic treatments on the growth of the Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. var. pekinensis Lour [Olson]). They considered treatments such as the type of organic fertilizer, location, and the cabbage hybrid used. Growth was estimated using the following parameters: yield, plant height, and…

A compound from the cheese fruit found to demonstrate anti-cancer properties

(Natural News) A study published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine revealed that nordamnacanthal, also called NDAM, has anti-breast cancer activities. NDAM is an anthraquinone extracted from the cheese fruit (Morinda citrifolia), which is known for having immunomodulating and cytotoxic activities. Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women. Aside from this, it…

New Moon In Libra: Intensity In Relationships

We are having a New Moon in Libra on October 9th, 2018 at 3:47am Universal Time. This is initiating a 29.5 day Lunar cycle and a new wave of energy for the coming month. This cycle will peak at the Full Moon in Taurus that is occurring on October 24th.

The Sun entered the Libra (of the tropical zodiac) at the previous Equinox on September 22nd/23rd. As an air sign, it is social and intellectual. Libra is about all types of relationships, as well as balance, fairness, equality, compromise, harmony, and diplomacy. As a Venus ruled sign, it is also associated with beauty, aesthetics, creativity, and appreciation of art.

Libra is about consideration and cooperation, however, because of this it can also be indecisive and lack direct action. It is still an initiating energy because it is a Cardinal sign, yet it mainly initiates socially, intellectually or anything to do with relating. Libra can be ‘people pleasing’ which can also translate as superficiality and fakeness.

Venus, Ruler of Libra, Is Now Retrograde

Venus went retrograde on October 5th/6th which will last until November 16th. Retrogrades are a time to revisit, reflect on, and make adjustments to things represented by that planet. Venus rules all of the same things associated with Libra (as mentioned) and also rules over money, values, sensuality, femininity, and pleasures.

With Venus just beginning its retrograde just prior to the New Moon, this really emphasizes a shift a potential for changes and re-orientation regarding Venus-Libra areas of life throughout this Lunar cycle, yet will still play out in the month following. You can read more about this Venus retrograde here.

New Moon Conjunct Ceres and Square Pluto, Venus Square Mars

This New Moon is aligned with Ceres, once classified as an asteroid but now considered a dwarf planet by astronomers. It is a feminine energy associated with nurturing, mothering, unconditional love, fertility, family, food, agriculture, sustainability, as well as the rhythms and cycles of womanhood.

Ceres is also associated with grief, loss, and separation. It can be about destroying to regain what was lost. Ceres has become increasingly used in astrology over the last decade and this is reflected in the shifts society is experiencing around women’s issues/rights, as well as both the constructive and destructive aspects of modern day feminism.

This New Moon and Ceres are both in a square with Pluto. This can bring Plutonian energy to Libran and Ceres themes mentioned above. It can be transformative, purging, renovating, regenerating, deep, powerful, sexual, and evolutionary.

However, it is a tense square which increases the potential of the more challenging qualities which can be intense, obsessive, compulsive, manipulative, secretive, dark, destructive, fearful, vengeful, and can trigger jealousy, power struggles, or reveal hidden matters. This energy is strongest from October 11th-12th, but it builds up leading up to those dates.

Venus retrograde is in the Plutonian sign of Scorpio while also  in a square with Mars which is strongest October 10th/11th. This reinforces some of the same themes regarding that square with Pluto. This can be  passionate when it comes to matters of love, or even socially and creatively. However, it can also stimulate tension and conflict.

Mercury is also in an opposition with Uranus on the same day, and this combined with Venus square Mars can trigger impulsive spending of resources. This can also reflect stimulating communications, ideas, and innovative thinking. However, this can make it harder for us to focus our minds, and there can also be some sort of disruptions or potential separations.

Making Intentions And Things To Consider

What has been coming up for you recently regarding your social life,  matters of love, and sexuality? Do you feel like you need to proceed differently when it comes to these areas?

What major changes can you make to bring in more harmony and balance in your life or regarding relationships? How could you evolve in your creative expression?  Do you feel like you need to make an aesthetic or stylistic revision in some way?

These are just some examples of what to consider or focus your intentions on at this time, however, it is good to reflect on anything else that is coming up for you. It is generally best to make any intentions within the first 24 hours following a New Moon. However, the closer the better and can be as early as 30 minutes prior to the exact moment of it. This New Moon will be occurring at 3:47am Universal Time. You can click here to see what that is in your time zone.

Follow me on INSTAGRAM, FACEBOOK, and YOUTUBE for more astrology related content.

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Looking for astrological insight into what is going on in your life? Or perhaps looking to better understand your life and its potentials? Get a personalized astrology reading with Carmen (author of this article) specific to you based on your exact birth date, time, and location. Click here for more information or to order.

 

 

Alleviate lower back pain naturally with traditional Persian therapies

(Natural News) Lower back pain is one of the most common pain symptoms among people aged 45 to 65. Unfortunately, contemporary lower back pain treatments are not always effective and even have side effects. Thus, there is an increasing interest in alternative pain treatments. In a study published in the Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge,…

America Is Committing Suicide: Over The Past 12 Months, The U.S. National Debt Has Increased By 1.271 Trillion Dollars

If we do not change course, our once great nation will be destroyed by a debt that has grown wildly out of control.  We are facing an unprecedented debt crisis that literally threatens to bring our country to an end, and yet our politicians are almost entirely silent on this issue in 2018.  In fact, Republicans and Democrats just worked together to pass another big, fat spending bill through Congress that is actually going to increase the pace at which we are going into debt.  What the Republicrats are doing is not just wrong.  To be honest, the truth is that they are committing crimes against humanity, and they are completely wiping out the very bright future that our children and our grandchildren were supposed to have.  How in the world is America supposed to be “great again” when we are buried in so much debt that future generations can never have any possible hope of getting free from it?

The fiscal year of the federal government goes from October 1st to September 30th.  During the fiscal year that just ended, the U.S. national debt increased by 1.271 trillion dollars

The federal debt increased by $1,271,158,167,126.72 in fiscal 2018according to data released today by the Treasury.

The total federal debt started the fiscal year at $20,244,900,016,053.51 according to the Treasury, and finished the fiscal year at $21,516,058,183,180.23.

This is one of the reasons why I wanted to go to Washington.  Our current “representatives” are completely and utterly failing us.

Once upon a time, at least members of the Tea Party would stand up and say something, but these days nobody seems to care that America’s future is being systematically destroyed.  Republicans have been in control of both houses of Congress, but our debt problems just continue to get worse and worse.  And the truth is that the budgets that have been passed since Donald Trump became president are simply slightly revised Obama budgets.  The Republicans have allowed the Democrats to have their way time after time, and it has been absolutely disgusting to watch.

In 8 of the past 11 fiscal years, the U.S. national debt has risen by more than a trillion dollars, and the U.S. national debt is now sitting at an all-time record high of 21.52 trillion dollars.

What we are doing is literally insane, and if we want our nation to survive we must change course immediately.

These days, there is a lot of discussion about the political gains that “Democratic socialists” have been making all over America, and Republicans are trying to assure us that the American people don’t actually want socialism.

But you know what?

We have already gone most of the way down the road toward socialism.  I think that Ron Paul made this point very well  in his most recent article

We know socialism does not work. It is an economic system based on the use of force rather than economic freedom of choice. But while many Americans seem to be in a panic over the failures of socialism in Venezuela, they don’t seem all that concerned that right here at home President Trump just signed a massive $1.3 trillion dollar spending bill that delivers socialism on a scale that Venezuelans couldn’t even imagine. In fact this one spending bill is three times Venezuela’s entire gross domestic product!

Did I miss all the Americans protesting this warfare-welfare state socialism?

If you are really against socialism, you should be fighting for the federal government to be greatly reduced in size and scope.

But so few Americans seem to believe in true limited government these days.

It would be a great first step if we would actually try to start living within our means.  But if 1.271 trillion dollars of government spending was pulled out of the economy over the past 12 months, the result would be a horrible economic depression.  And politicians do not like economic downturns, because when things get bad voters tend not to vote for incumbents.  So they just keep going into more debt and they keep kicking the can down the road.

But if we stay on the path that we are currently on, the CBO says that the United States will be 99 trillion dollars in debt by 2048.

Of course we will never actually ever get to 99 trillion dollars in debt.  America will cease to exist long before we ever reach that mark.

If we want to save America, we must take action now, but very few people seem to even care about our exploding debt at this point.

And it isn’t just our national debt that is the problem.  State and local government debt is at record levels all over the nation, corporate debt has doubled since the last financial crisis, and U.S. consumers are more than 13 trillion dollars in debt

If you added up the personal debt of every American?—?what they owe on their mortgages, credit cards, student loans, and more?—?the total is staggering. Collectively, we’re $13.2 trillion in the red. That’s the highest ever, according to the New York Fed.

Yet no one seems to be panicking. Maybe that’s because we can’t comprehend $13 trillion. Imagine buying every NFL team. And every NBA team. And every NHL team. And every Major League Baseball team. But that only adds up to $191 billion.

America is committing suicide in slow-motion, and it is an absolutely heartbreaking thing to witness.

It is almost as if we lack the will to survive as a nation.  All we seem to care about is our comfort level at this moment, and we don’t want anyone to tell us that we have to cut back on anything.  I think that Chris Martenson summed things up very well in his most recent piece

Nothing grows forever.  Cancer tries, but always defeats itself in the process.  Yeast parties until all the sugar in the vat is gone or it pollutes itself out of an active existence.

Can humans do better? The jury is still out on that.

But so far, the signs say that, as a group, we lack the ability to organize effectively against big, complex challenges. Especially if doing so requires us to willingly choose to live a life of less. We’re simply too addicted to more.

We cannot continue to go down this road.

Because at the end of this road is not just economic collapse.  What we are talking about is literally the end of the United States of America.

All throughout history, great societies have been done in by greed, sloth, corruption and laziness, and we are headed down the exact same path.  If we want to survive, emergency surgery is necessary, but at this point nobody is even tending to the dying patient.

About the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is publisher of The Most Important Newsand the author of four books including The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters.